Safely Dive Into Your Fears with Virtual Reality

What makes you afraid? Not like jump-scares in movies or the rush of a roller-coaster, but what are your legitimate fears that qualify as phobias? Spiders? Clowns? Blood? Flying? Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin are experimenting with exposure therapy in virtual reality to help people manage their fears. For some phobias, like arachnophobia, the fear of spiders, this seems like a perfect fit. If you are certain that you are safely in a spider-free laboratory wearing a VR headset, and you see a giant spider crawling across your field of vision, the fear may be more manageable than being asked to put your hand into a populated spider tank.

After the experimental therapy, participants were asked to take the spider tank challenge. Subjects who were not shown VR spiders were less enthusiastic about keeping their hands in the tank. This is not definitive proof, but it is a promising start.

High-end VR equipment and homemade rigs are in the budget for many gamers and hackers, and our archives are an indication of how much the cutting-edge crowd loves immersive VR. We have been hacking 360 recording for nearly a decade, long before 360 cameras took their niche in the consumer market. Maybe when this concept is proven out a bit more, implementations will start appearing in our tip lines with hackers who helped their friends get over their fears.

Via IEEE Spectrum.

Photo by Wokandapix.

Pinging the Depths of a Rain Barrel

Rain barrels are a great way to go green, as long as your neighborhood doesn’t frown upon them. [NikonUser]’s barrel sits up high enough that he has to climb up on an old BBQ and half-dangle from the pipe to check the water level, all the while at the risk of encountering Australian spiders.

Arachnophobia, it turns out, is a great motivator. At first, [NikonUser] dreamed up a solar-powered IoT doodad that would check the level and report the result on a web page. He battled the Feature Creep and decided to build a handheld device that pings the water level with an ultrasonic sensor and displays it on a 7-segment.

Everything is contained in a water-resistant box and driven by an Arduino Pro. The box is mounted on a piece of scrap lumber that lays across the top of the barrel. This allows the HC-SR04’s eyes to peer over the edge and send pings toward the bottom. It also helps to keep the readings consistent and the electronics from taking a swim.

Operation is simple: [NikonUser] reaches up, sets the plank across the barrel, and pushes the momentary. This activates the Arduino, which prompts the HC-SR04 to take several readings. The code averages these readings, does a little math, and displays the percentage of water remaining in the barrel.

Interested in harvesting rain water, but not sure what to do with it? You can use it for laundry, pour it in the toilet tank instead of flushing, or make an automated watering system for your garden.