Friday Hack Chat: Making and Breaking Hardware with Bunnie

bunnie03-01This Friday, February 10th, at 9am PST, Hackaday.io will be graced with one of the greatest hardware creators in recent memory. [Bunnie Huang] will be talking about making and breaking hardware in the Hackaday.io Hack Chat.

[Bunnie] is a nearly peerless hardware hacker. He literally wrote the book on hacking the XBox, developed the Chumby, and developed the Novena, an open source Laptop. He’s torn down the Form 2 3D printer, explored the iPhone’s hackability with [Edward Snowden], wrote the book you want to have on your carryon when flying into Hong Kong, and recently released The Hardware Hacker, a retelling of his adventures in hardware hacking. He’s now working on the Love to Code platform.

[Bunnie] is a bridge across worlds. There is no one else so deeply embedded in the world of electronics manufacturing that is also willing to tell the world about what he’s found. If you want to learn about electronics, the Bunnie Studios blog is a mandatory read.

For this week’s Hack Chat, [Bunnie] will be taking questions from the Hackaday.io community. If you’ve ever wanted to know what it takes to build a few thousand things, this is the guy to ask.

Having trouble figuring out when 09:00 PST is in your local time zone? Here’s a countdown timer!

Here’s How To Take Part:

Buttons to join the project and enter the Hack Chat
Buttons to join the project and enter the Hack Chat

Our Hack Chats are live community events on Hackaday.io Hack Chat group messaging. Log into Hackaday.io, visit that page, and look for the ‘Join this Project’ Button. Once you’re part of the project, the button will change to ‘Team Messaging’, which takes you directly to the Hack Chat.

You don’t have to wait until Friday; join whenever you want and you can see what the community is talking about.

Upcoming Hack Chats

These Hack Chats are a weekly thing, and we have a few more on the books. Next week, we’ll be covering RF design with [Jenny List], and later going over mechanical manufacturing with Fictiv. You can check out all the upcoming Hack Chats on this project.

Hack Chat: The Incredible Sprite_tm and The ESP32

This Friday at 5pm PST, [Sprite_tm] will be leading a Hack Chat talking about the ESP32.

[Sprite_tm] should require no introduction, but we’re going to do it anyway. He’s can install Linux on a hard drive. He can play video games on his keyboard. He built the world’s tiniest Game Boy, and gave the greatest talk I’ve ever seen. Right now, [Sprite] is in China working on the guts of the ESP32, the next great WiFi and Bluetooth uberchip.

[Sprite] recently packed his bags and headed over to Espressif, creators of the ESP32. He’s one of the main devs over there, and he’s up to his neck in the varied and weird peripherals contained in this chip. His job includes porting NES emulators to a WiFi-enabled microcontroller. If you want to learn about the latest and greatest microcontroller, this is the guy you want to talk to, and he’s taking all questions.

Note that we usually do these things earlier in the day but this week we start rolling at 5 PM Pacific Friday to help match up with [Sprite’s] timezone. You can figure out when this event will happen with this handy time and date converter.

Here’s How To Take Part:

Buttons to join the project and enter the Hack Chat
Buttons to join the project and enter the Hack Chat

Our Hack Chats are live community events on the Hackaday.io Hack Chat group messaging. Log into hackaday.io, visit that page, and look for the ‘Join this Project’ Button. Once you’re part of the project, the button will change to ‘Team Messaging’, which takes you directly to the Hack Chat.

You don’t have to wait until Friday; join whenever you want and you can see what the community is talking about.

And Tindie Too

In addition to [Sprite]’s Hack Chat on Friday, we’re going to have a Tindie Chat in the Tindie Dog Park on Friday at noon, Pacific time. You can figure out when that’ll be in your local time by following this link.

In the Tindie Chat, we’re going to be talking about all the aspects of selling hardware on Tindie. This is a phenomenal community that keeps on growing, and right now there’s some really, really cool hardware being offered up from makers and creators around the world.

Upcoming Hack Chats

We have a few more Hack Chats on the books. On February 10th, we’ll be talking RF with [Jenny List]. Sparkfun will be around for a Hack Chat on February 17th. If stats are your thing, we’ll have a chat on the ins and outs of R in a few weeks.

Friday Hack Chat: Eagle PCB Design with Matt Berggren

Eagle is a household name for all Hackaday regulars. Here’s your chance to learn about upcoming features, get your ‘how do I do this in Eagle?’ questions answered, and get your wishlist items heard. Join us on Friday at 12:00 PST for a live Hack Chat about the Eagle PCB Design software.

Hosting this week’s discussion is [Matt Berggren], also known on Hackaday.io as technolomaniac. Matt is the Director of Autodesk Circuits and with Autodesk’s acquisition of Eagle last summer, the popular schematic design and PCB layout software falls under his purview. He has an extensive background in designing printed circuit boards — if you can do it in EDA software he knows how — this is an excellent opportunity to get answered the questions that have been stumping you.

Don’t miss this Hack Chat! Here’s a handy web tool to help convert 1/13/17 at 12:00 PST to your local time.

Here’s How to Take Part:

join-project-team-message-buttons
Buttons to join the Hacker Channel and enter Hack Chat

Hack Chat are live community events that take place in the Hackaday.io Hacker Channel. Visit that page (make sure you are logged in) and look for the “Join this Project Button” in the upper right. Once you are part of the Hacker Channel, that button will change to “Team Messaging” which takes you to the Hack Chat.

You don’t have to wait for Friday, join Hack Chat whenever you like and see what the community is currently talking about.

Join Us Next Week Too for KiCad!

Are you more of a KiCad person than an Eagle person? You should still drop by this week to see if Matt changes your mind. But block out your calendar next week when [Wayne Stambaugh], one of the lead developers of KiCad will join us for a Hack Chat on Friday, 1/20/17.

Hackaday.io Just Passed 100,000 Members

Today, Hackaday.io passed 100,000 registered users. It seems like yesterday that I wrote a post about passing 10k but that was last year already! Much has happened in that year, and there is much more to come. Thank you to everyone that makes Hackaday.io great by interacting with each other, posting about what is going on in basements, garages, hackerspaces, and workplaces, and finding new and interesting ways of making the site your very own. Your involvement has made Hackaday.io the greatest open source hardware resource in the world.

We don’t call it project hosting. The seed idea did start as project hosting for the hardware hacker, but Hackaday.io has long since outgrown that pair of shoes. It’s become a self-sustaining reaction that grows ever bigger and more awesome as everyone gets involved and decides how and what they want to do.

hackchatOne of the major additions to Hackaday.io this year was group messaging. This spawned an explosion of new communities within Hackaday.io starting with the Hacker Channel. Anyone may request to be a team member and will then gain access to the group messaging; there are now well over 500 members. We’ve scheduled many somewhat-formal events on the channel over the last few months that invited people to show off what they’re building and ask for feedback. That evolved into topic-based sessions on things like FPGA design and what you need to know about manufacturing. Many of these were co-hosted by Hackaday Staff and community members.

This bizarre text is part of the itanimulli profile
This bizarre text is part of the itanimulli profile

A curious event on the site was the appearance of the user itanimulli who join and registered the vanity URL: /conspiracy. This is an enigma. The user is a puzzler and has posted a number of images and other challenges that appear to include hidden data. How do you solve something like this? Get all of your friends involved, of course! Thomas Wilson started a project to solve the itanimulli puzzle and posted about it on the stack to invite teammates to the challenge.

Hackaday.io has spilled over into the real world too. Do you ever look at the valuable odds and ends in your workshop that you know someone will use, but you never will? The Travelling Hacker Box is the answer to that conundrum. It’s the “take a penny, leave a penny” of the hacker world. Get on the project and get in line to receive the box. When it hits your workshop, take out something cool but then we want to see you build something with it! Replace what you took with something of your own and send it to the next person. International shipping has not been solved yet for this particular box, but nothing is stopping you from starting an EU version.

The support we’ve seen from the hardware community for Hackaday.io is one of the reasons we’ve set out to do something new. In just a few weeks the first ever Hackaday SuperConference will be held. Two days of talks and workshops let us meet in person the users we’ve grown close to through the site. I hope to see you there. But if not just ping me on Hackaday.io!

Or course 100k isn’t the only interesting number. We’ve got more juicy statistics in the image below.

Continue reading “Hackaday.io Just Passed 100,000 Members”