Morse code clock

[Johnny Carlo] put another spin on clock displays with his Propeller-based Morse Code clock. He repurposed a tap light, using the tap function as a switch input and actuating the bulb inside with the help of a transistor. If you want to know the time just give it a tap and the device will transmit back to you in a series of flashes. This is great if you’re contemplating a career as a Navy Signalman or just need another way to practice Morse Code.

[Thanks Mike]

Comments

  1. Drake says:

    Cool concept.

    I’m surprised that nobody has commented on the use of propellers in underpowered applications. This certinally doesnt make use of the full abilities of the 8 processors.

    On that note maybe someone should use a propeller to build all of the clocks mentiond on HaD into one clock sculpture. 50 or so clocks in one piece . . . much better then just one overpowered clock.

  2. @Drake
    I use the Prop on all kinds of applications that don’t need the horsepower. I understand optimizing the ucontroller if you’re going to make 1,000 pcs, but what’s the cost difference if you’re only going to make a few? Saving $2 or $3 isn’t worth it if you don’t already know how to program an ATiny.

    Clocks are a staple of DIY projects – I don’t know why. Even I’ve done a few…

    I don’t think morse code is taught in the navy anymore. I remember when I got my radio license, they had gotten rid of most morse requirements – are there any licenses that require morse code any more?

  3. lay-z-eye says:

    Requirement or not, many radio operators still use Morse code to communicate.

  4. schmidtn says:

    Morse is still taught in the Navy (and all branches, even Coasties) but they don’t have signalmen anymore, QMs don’t even learn it. Some CTRs learn to become morse-ops, but I think that’s it.

  5. Amos says:

    I like the idea, and HaD’s pun =D (But I would replace the incandescent with an LED or two… maybe even incorporate multiple colors)

  6. Hirudinea says:

    Just to thoughts, first replace the light with a sounder of some sort and second, make somthing that will translate that stupid twitter into morse (sure I hate twitter, but it would be a chalange to translate it.)

  7. Marc says:

    Actually, I’m pretty sure it’s pronounced “Parallax”.

  8. Urza9814 says:

    I like the idea of using multiple colored LEDs…but ramp it up a bit. When it flashes the time, it should do the hours in one color, the minutes in another, the seconds in a third. Simultaneously. That’d probably take the prize for most difficult clock to read…

  9. John Carlos says:

    Hey, thanks for posting my project!

    @Drake – most certainly this is an underpowered use of the Propeller. It was a learning project for me. On the other hand it was nice being able to separate the time keeping process from the display, and not having to worry that the display process messing up the time tracking.

    @Marc – yea, I mispronounced it :( Ah well.

    John

  10. vonskippy says:

    “Probably a Novelty Item”

    No way – every house should have one.

  11. nanodude says:

    Geesh, I already have trouble reading time with large display digital clocks!

    However, the propeller chip is a cutie though! :)

  12. blue carbuncle says:

    I could see this being useful on a microwave oven clock. You could push the tap button and it could tell you how long there was left on the cooking time without having to get up from your couch.

  13. Mikey says:

    It’s neat that your propeller has all the pins labeled right on it — mine don’t have that — is there a special series you ordered?

    I’m not really using the propellers anymore, but this would be a real timer saver when deving with other MCUs like different models of ATMEGAs and PICs.

  14. John Carlos says:

    @Mikey – It came with the Education Kit. Unfortunately they do not sell it separately. You can find the artwork here though, and print one to on a sticky label:

    http://forums.parallax.com/forums/default.aspx?f=25&m=405118&g=405890#m405890

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