Hackaday Podcast 066: The Audio Overdub Episode; Tape Loop Scratcher, Typewriter Simulator, And Relay Adder

Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys stomp through a forest full of highly evolved hardware hacks. This week seems particularly plump with audio-related projects, like the thwack-tackular soldenoid typewriter simulator. But it’s the tape-loop scratcher that steals our hearts; an instrument that’s kind of two-turntables-and-a-microphone meets melloman. We hear the clicks of 10-bit numbers falling into place in a delightful adder, and follow it up with the beeps and sweeps of a smartphone-based metal detector.

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3 thoughts on “Hackaday Podcast 066: The Audio Overdub Episode; Tape Loop Scratcher, Typewriter Simulator, And Relay Adder

  1. Tiptronic, or robotic clutch in general, is not really a substitute for a traditional torque converter automatic. It works if you’re going fast around a track and trying to minimize your shifting times, but crawling around in traffic tends to get herky jerky because the torque control depends on the throttle instead – the gearbox is just on and off. It gets worse when the car gets older and everything starts going out of tolerance and out of tune.

    Imagine in a manual gearbox if you had to either floor the clutch or dump the clutch all the time. It would work if you had perfect touch on the throttle. Now in a real car, after about 5-8 years of abuse, the engine won’t idle at exactly 900 RPM anymore because the ECU is hunting for the right mixture…

      1. LOL. I guess I’ve become German. Here we use “tiptronic” like Kleenex.

        What I meant was the Porsche/Audi/VW version of the you-shift-it automatic, rather than the stuff the F1 drivers race around with by the same name.

        Anecdote time: I drive stick, but I’m totally fine with automatics. I somehow just get into “automatic mode” and shut off my left foot entirely. The one thing that can wake it back up, though, is trying to shift one of those automatic-manual things. The hand-foot coordination is just too strong…

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