The Difference Between 4WD And AWD

Car manufacturers will often tout a vehicle’s features to appeal to the market, and this often leads to advertisements featuring a cacophony of acronyms and buzzwords to dazzle and confuse the prospective buyer. This can be particularly obvious when looking at drivelines. The terms four-wheel drive, all-wheel drive, and full-time and part-time are bandied about, but what do they actually mean? Are they all the same, meaning all wheels are driven or is there more to it? Let’s dive into the technology and find out.

Part-Time 4WD

Part-time four-wheel drive is the simplest system, most commonly found on older off-road vehicles like Jeeps, Land Cruisers and Land Rovers up to the early 1990s, as well as pickup trucks and other heavy duty applications. In these vehicles, the engine sends its power to a transfer case, which sends an equal amount of torque to the front and rear differentials, and essentially ties their input shafts together. This is good for slippery off-road situations, as some torque is provided to both axles at all times. However, this system has the drawback that it can’t be driven in four-wheel drive mode at all times. With the front and rear differentials rotating together, any difference in rotational speed between the front and rear wheels — such as from turning a corner or uneven tyre wear — would cause a problem. The drive shaft going to one differential would want to turn further than the other, a problem known as wind-up.

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How To Get Into Cars: Offroading Mods

While plenty of automotive enthusiasts are all about carving corners at the local track days, it’s a special breed that leaves tarmac behind for the dusty trail ahead. If your chosen ride is of the four-wheelin’ variety, here’s how you can modify it to dominate the dirt and mud.

Handling The Terrain

Building a good offroad rig requires a very different focus than building a car for street performance. A screaming high-performance engine is of no use when your tires are spinning in the air because you’re stuck in deep sand or on top of a pointy rock. Instead, four wheelers are concerned with a whole different set of parameters. Ground clearance is key to getting over obstacles without getting stuck, and good articulation is key to keeping your wheels on the ground and pushing you forward in deep ruts and on crazy angles. You’ll also want plenty of low-down torque, and tyres that can grip up in all conditions without snagging a puncture. It’s a whole different ballgame, so read on!

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Re-used Materials Make Tiny Offroad Track For Micro R/C

What does one do with tiny 1:35 scale remote controlled off-road vehicles? Build appropriately-tiny tracks for them to drive on, of course. That’s exactly what [David] did when he created his fantastic rock crawling track that he has dubbed the ‘4×4 Arena’, and what’s even better is that he used leftover foam inserts and acrylic paints and materials to do it, and didn’t have to spend a penny.

The original track is only just visible in the back; the new track expands it considerably.

This isn’t [David]’s first track. He originally made a smaller rock-crawling track he called Rubble Wasteland for the tiny vehicles, and he liked it so much he expanded it considerably. The new track builds on the original and is three levels deep, sports tight cave-like passages, tunnels, tricky climbs, and and realistic terrain textures.

An enormous photo gallery┬áis right here, and other than the first and final images, it’s roughly in chronological build order. If your curiosity has been piqued about the tiny 1:35 scale remote controlled vehicles that this track is built for, around gallery page nine is where pictures of what makes these tiny things tick begins.

We have seen some amazing projects in the RC field; like this tiny 3D printed truck, and in-depth details of a micro RC plane that weighs only 2.9 grams.