Reinforce Happy Faces With Marshmallows And Computer Vision

Bing Crosby famously sang “Just let a smile be your umbrella.” George Carlin, though, said, “Let a smile be your umbrella, and you’ll end up with a face full of rain.” [BebBrabyn] probably agrees more with the former and used a Raspberry Pi with Open CV to detect a smile, a feature some digital cameras have had for a long time. This project however doesn’t take a snapshot. It launches a marshmallow using a motor-driven catapult. We wondered if he originally tried lemon drops until too many people failed to catch them properly.

This wouldn’t be a bad project for a young person — as seen in the video below — although you might have to work a bit to duplicate it. The catapult was upcycled from a broken kid’s toy. You might have to run to the toy store or rig something up yourself. Perhaps you could 3D print it or replace it with a trebuchet or compressed air.

Continue reading “Reinforce Happy Faces With Marshmallows And Computer Vision”

Cerebrum: Mobile Passwords Lifted Acoustically with NASB

 

There are innumerable password hacking methods but recent advances in acoustic and accelerometer sensing have opened up the door to side-channel attacks, where passwords or other sensitive data can be extracted from the acoustic properties of the electronics and human interface to the device. A recent and dramatic example includes the hacking of RSA encryption  simply by listening to the frequencies of sound a processor puts out when crunching the numbers.

Now there is a new long-distance hack on the scene. The Cerebrum system represents a recent innovation in side-channel password attacks leveraging acoustic signatures of mobile and other electronic devices to extract password data at stand-off distances.

Continue reading “Cerebrum: Mobile Passwords Lifted Acoustically with NASB”