Generating Beetles From Public Domain Images

Ever since [Ian Goodfellow] and his colleagues invented the generative adversarial network (GAN) in 2014, hundreds of projects, from style transfers to poetry generators, have been produced using the concept of contesting neural networks. Unlike traditional neural networks, GANs can generate new data that fits statistically within the same set as the training set.

[Bernat Cuni], the one-man design team behind [cunicode] came up with the idea to generate beetles using this technique. Inspired by material published on Machine Learning for Artists, he decided to deploy some visual experiments with zoological illustrations. The training data was found from a public domain book hosted at archive.org, found through the Biodiversity Heritage Library. A combination of OpenCV and ImageMagick helped with individually extracting illustrations to squared images.

[Cuni] then ran a DCGAN with the data set, generating the first set of quasi-beetles after some tinkering with epochs and settings. After the failed first experiment, he went with StyleGAN, setting up a machine at PaperSpace with 1 GPU and running the training for >3 days on 128 px images. The results were much better, but fairly small and the cost of running the machine was quite expensive (>€125).

Given the success of the previous experiment, he decided to transfer over to Google CoLab, using their 12 hours of K80 GPU per run for free to generate some more beetles. With the intent on producing more HD beetles, he used Runway trained on 1024 px beetles, discovering much better results after 3000 steps. The model was moved over to Google CoLab to produce HD outputs.

He has since continued to experiment with the beetles, producing some confusing generated images and fun collectibles.

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Artistic Collaboration With AI

Ever since Google’s Deep Dream results were made public several years ago, there has been major interest in the application of AI and neural network technologies to artistic endeavors. [Helena Sarin] has been experimenting in just this field, exploring the possibilities of collaborating with the ghost in the machine.

This image was generated with a landscape model using a dataset containing covers of Japanese poetry books.

The work is centered around the use of Generative Adversarial Networks, or GANs. [Helena] describes using a GAN to create artworks as a sort of game. An apprentice attempts to create new works in the style of their established master, while a critic attempts to determine whether the artworks are created by the master or the apprentice. As the apprentice improves, the critic must become more discerning; as the critic becomes more discerning, the apprentice must improve further. It is through this mechanism that the model improves itself.

[Helena] has spent time experimenting with CycleGAN in the artistic realm after first using it in a work project, and has primarily trained it on her own original artworks to create new pieces with wild and exciting results. She shares several tips on how best to work with the technology, around the necessary computing and storage requirements, as well as ways to step out of the box to create more diverse outputs.

Neural networks are hot lately, with plenty of research going on in the field. There’s plenty of fun projects, too – like this cartoonifying camera we featured recently.