McBlare: a robot bagpipe player

mcblare (Custom)

We all want our very own personal bagpiper. Playing it ourselves is too much effort, and keeping a full time bagpiper around can be a pain. You have to feed them, clothe them, give them union breaks, etc. Luckily, modern technology has come to the rescue again. You can have your very own robot bagpiper. McBlare plays the bagpipe with technical proficiency that would be impossible for most humans. But lets hear it put some soul into it.

[via BotJunkie]

Rapid prototyping with sugar and lasers

IMG_2309 (Custom)

After the recent announcement of the re-release of the candyfab, [4volt] had to give a run at melting sugar with a laser. It turns out that a 40w co2 laser works great. They don’t currently have a method of layering, so everything is one layer currently.You can see the results of different speeds and power ratings on the site. The next party they throw will have some pretty fancy tasty treats.

Table for electronic dreams

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The table for electronic dreams is an interactive table that is sensitive to electric activity.  Though it looks similar to the table built by EMSL, this one lights up based on electromagnetic fields. You can get the schematics and such from the instructable, but there is also a video located at the bottom of the project’s home page. It would be really cool if the effect could be localized more.

1 meter POV

dinaf1 (Custom)

Here’s another POV project for you. It’s pretty big, at 1 meter in diameter, not quite as large as the stupidly huge one. What is interesting about this display is that it has a dual motor set up. The original motor didn’t quite have the power to get the display up to the required speed.  A second one was added as the shaft of the rotor. Yes, one motor is actually spinning another motor that is spinning the display. Well, it’s hard to tell from the description. The original motor might be completely unused, but left in place.

Eye tracking via electrical impulse

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Generally when tracking eye movement we use various methods that require sensors being pointed at the eye itself. This approach is quite different in that it is sensing the “electrical potential of the cornea”. We have no idea how this works, but it looks pretty cool.

[via HackedGadgets]

1964 300baud modem surfs the web

[phreakmonkey] got his hands on a great piece of old tech. It’s a 1964 Livermore Data Systems Model A Acoustic Coupler Modem. He recieved it in 1989 and recently decided to see if it would actually work. It took some digging to find a proper D25 adapter and even then the original serial adapter wasn’t working because the oscillator depends on the serial voltage. He dials in and connects at 300baud. Then logs into a remote system and fires up lynx to load Wikipedia. Lucky for [phreakmonkey] they managed to decide on a modulation standard in 1962. It’s still amazing to see this machine working 45 years later. He’d love to hear from you if you’ve used a similar device.

[via Waxy]

CandyFab relaunched

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Forget about machines that can replicate themselves, what we want is a machine capable of making an 8 inch wide hollow torus out of sugar. The CandyFab project has been around for a while, but with the release of the new machine, the CandyFab 6000 they are reinventing the project. Built from the ground up to be a candy constructing beast, the CandyFab 6000 might be a little smaller than the previous version, but it’s much better designed. You can get more details on the new wiki site.

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