A BCD Wristwatch You’d Want To Wear

Timepieces are a staple of Hackaday, we have featured so many of them over the years that for us to become really excited by a fresh one it must be particularly special. The days when simply breaking out the Nixies was enough are long past.

So this binary wristwatch project by [Sverd Industries] definitely caught our eye. Not for being particularly novel, after all binary LED clocks are not in themselves hard, but for the exceptionally high quality of its construction. It’s a simple enough design, with a real-time clock chip and an ATmega328 in its most power-sipping mode on a circular PCB with an array of LEDs as the display, and all contained within a 3D-printed shell.

This design has real quality, the discrete components are tucked underneath the board leaving the  ICs on the top with only the LEDs for company. The glass front is glued into place, and the shell is professionally 3D-printed. Power comes from a single CR2032, and to save battery life the LEDs are only activated by the press of a concealed button. We would wear this watch. For that matter, you would wear this watch. Take a look at the video below the break, and we’re sure you’ll agree. Looks like a few are even available over on Tindie.

This isn’t the first binary watch we’ve featured, so it’s tough to pick a comparison. This very low BoM example might lack some of the polish of the one presented here, but it has the same ability to catch our eye.

Continue reading “A BCD Wristwatch You’d Want To Wear”

Prove Your Geek Cred With A Binary Watch

Binary Wrist Watch

After just one prototype, [Elia] has finished his super awesome Binary Wrist Watch.

He designed the PCB in KiCad, using a template for the PIC he found in a standard library — unfortunately it turns out the SSOP-20 PIC footprint in this library was actually a TSSOP-20. Confusingly enough, there was also a TSSOP-20 footprint in the library. Luckily it’s just a few millimeters off so [Elia] was able to just bend the pins in a bit before reflow soldering it in place.

The trickiest part of the project was actually making the wristband. He tried several different styles before settling on a paracord braid design he found on Instructables.

We especially like his quote at the end of the project:

Although not having worn the watch in the presence of normal humans, I can already guarantee that now everyone will be able to easily identify me as a nerd.

Acceptance is the first step in realizing you have an addiction, right?

[via Dangerous Prototypes]