Dad’s Custom Xbox Adaptive Controller Build For His Child

When Microsoft announced the Xbox adaptive controller earlier this year, many were pleasantly surprised at how adaptive it truly was. The controller features 3.5mm jacks for easily connecting any external input device and sports an impressive build quality given its price tag, but the most impressive part was the fact that the design was so open in nature. Rather than seeking to create a specific design solution tailored to a subset of users the adaptive controller acts more as a hub for the community’s designs. One of those brilliant designs comes from [Colton] who posted a five-part series on his custom controller build for his daughter.

Xbox One Adaptive Controller Build Push Button Switches

His daughter, Ellie, has Cornelia de Lange syndrome which prevents her from being able to use more conventional pressure sensitive input devices. So [Colton] devised a way for buttons to be pressed using an alternate range of motion. By attaching foam massage inserts to standard paint rollers, the buttons could be triggered by allowing the peaks and valleys of the foam to roll over the top of each button. He could achieve even better accuracy by attaching braided ribbon over the buttons in order to prevent binding.

After finding that setup to be successful, [Colton] went about designing a frame. He arrived at using PVC pipe and utilizing tees as anchor points for the rollers. A couple of steel hose clamps are enough to hold each of the foam rollers in place, and the contact distance can be dialed in with buttons housed in threaded PVC adapters (shown right). After the addition of a little colored wrap here and there the build has a decidedly cheery exterior.

However, the build was not complete without a custom piece of software to match. [Colton] reached out for help from his nephew to program a “RGB Etch-a-Sketch” they called Sundoodler. The game runs on a small form factor PC hooked up to a projector so Ellie can play lying down. [Colton] has some future plans for his daughter’s custom Xbox adaptive controller build, but for now you can see the results in the video below.

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Simple RFID Access System Clone

rfidbboards

A few months back, [John] was reading an article about a simple RFID security system kit, and decided he would like to build one himself.  While many of the system’s details, including full schematics were provided, he was dismayed to find that the source code for the project was not published as it was held under copyright by the manufacturer.  Believing that open source is better, he modified the original design, replacing their PIC controller with an ATmega328 armed with an Arduino bootloader.

His system replicates all of the original kit’s functionality, while offering plenty of opportunity for modification beyond the initial design.  The article contains a complete parts list, wiring schematic, and the Arduino code required to get things up and running.  He even has a video of his clone at work, demonstrating the acceptance and rejection of RFID tags as well as the system’s learning mode.

Access Controller Demo

Embedded above is a review/demo of [Ben Heck]’s Access Controller. The controller is designed for one handed use and has reconfigurable/hackable modules. The reviewer is [BawNeY] a one-handed Major League Gamer. When using a standard controller, he cradles it on his lap, steering with one hand, and hitting the trigger with his elbow. The new controller looks a lot easier to use.