Multi-switch Useless Box Is Useless In Multiple Ways

We’ve probably all seen (and built) a useless box, in which you flip a switch that activates a servo that pops out a finger and flips the switch off. [Coffeman500] decided to take this a step further by building a useless box with multiple switches. Flip one, the finger pops out to flip it back. Flip several switches, and the finger pops out and flips each back in turn.

It’s a smart build that [coffeeman500] says is his first electronics build. The compulsively switching brain of this is an ATmega328 driving an A4988 stepper motor driver, with one stepper moving the finger mechanism and the other moving the finger along a rail to reach each switch in turn. [Coffeeman500] has released the complete plans for this wonderful waste of time, including 3D models for the box and mechanism, plus the code. Redditors are already planning bigger and more useless designs with more switches, a pursuit that we fully support.

Continue reading “Multi-switch Useless Box Is Useless In Multiple Ways”

PCB Junk Drawer Turned Into Blinky Mosaic

We’ve all got a box full of old PCBs, just waiting to be stripped of anything useful. [Dennis1a4] decided to do something with his, turning it into an attractive mosaic that he hung on the wall of his new workshop. But this isn’t just a pile of old PCBs: [Dennis1a4] decided to use the LEDs that were on many of the old boards, creating a blinky junk build. That’s kind of neat in itself, but he then decided to go further, building in an IR receiver so he could control the blinkiness, and a PIR sensor that detected when someone was near the mosaic.

This whole setup is controlled by an ATMega328p  that is driving a couple of PCF8575 port expanders that drive the LEDs. These blink in Morse code patterns. [Dennis1a4] also used an array of DIP switches on one of the boards to randomize the patterns, and wired in a pizeo buzzer on another board to make appropriate bleepy noises.

Continue reading “PCB Junk Drawer Turned Into Blinky Mosaic”

Talking To Alexa With Sign Language

As William Gibson once noted, the future is already here, it just isn’t equally distributed. That’s especially true for those of us with disabilities. [Abishek Singh] wanted to do something about that, so he created a way for the hearing-impaired to use Amazon’s Alexa voice service. He did this using a TensorFlow deep learning network to convert American Sign Language (ASL) to speech and a speech-to-text converter to interpret the response. This all runs on a laptop, so it should work with any voice interface with a bit of tweaking. In particular, [Abishek] seems to have created a custom bit of ASL to trigger Alexa. Perhaps the next step would be to use a robotic arm to create the output directly in ASL and cut out the Echo device completely? [Abishek] has not released the code for this project yet, but he has released the code for other projects, such as Peeqo, the robot that responds with GIFs.

[Via FlowingData and [Belg4mit]]

Continue reading “Talking To Alexa With Sign Language”

Dual Source Laser Cutter Built Like a Tank, Cuts Most Anything

Laser cutters aren’t the sort of thing that you might think about making at home, but there’s no reason not to if you are careful and do your research. That’s what [Daniele Ingrassia] did with the Laser Duo, an open source laser cutter that has two light sources for cutting various materials. His final product is not a small device: it has a press-formed aluminum case that looks more like a World War I tank than a piece of precision machinery. But that’s for a good reason: you don’t mess about with lasers, especially the 130 Watt CO2 and 75 Watt Yag lasers that the Laser Duo uses. Continue reading “Dual Source Laser Cutter Built Like a Tank, Cuts Most Anything”

Interactive Mandelbrot Set Viewer Runs on FPGAs

The Mandelbrot Set is a mathematical oddity where a simple function creates an infinitely complex landscape that you can literally zoom into forever. Like most people, I’ve downloaded Mandelbrot set viewers and marveled at the infinite whorls and spirals, and then waited while each frame took minutes or hours to render as I zoomed in. [Michael Henning], [Max Rademacher] and [Jonathan Plattner] decided to throw some modern computational muscle at this problem by building an interactive Mandelbrot set viewer using a laptop and two FPGA boards.

Continue reading “Interactive Mandelbrot Set Viewer Runs on FPGAs”

Teardown Of Sonos And Amazon Smart Speakers Reveals Interesting Engineering Details

Taking things apart is always fun, and this What Cracking Open a Sonos One Tells Us About the Sonos IPO”>excellent writeup of a teardown of a Sonos and Amazon smart speaker by [Ben Einstein] shows what you can learn. [Ben] is a Venture Capitalist and engineer, so much of his write up focuses on what the devices say about how the company spends money. There are plenty of things to learn for hackers, though: he details how the Sonos One uses a PCI daughterboard for wireless communications, while the Amazon Echo has a programmable radio on the main board.

Continue reading “Teardown Of Sonos And Amazon Smart Speakers Reveals Interesting Engineering Details”

Pinball Wizard Hacks Table for Tommy Stage Show

Ever since he was a young hacker
[Mark Gibson] has messed with the silver ball.
From Soho down to Denver
he must have fixed them all.
But we ain’t seen anything like this
in any amusement hall.
That darn devious hacker
sure hacks a mean pinball.

He hacks it like an expert,
Becomes part of the machine
Automating all the bumpers
Always wiring clean
His table plays by automation,
And radio control for all
That darn devious hacker
sure hacks a mean pinball.

Continue reading “Pinball Wizard Hacks Table for Tommy Stage Show”