FreeRTOS Gets Class

[Michael Becker] has been using FreeRTOS for about seven years. He decided to start adding some features and has a very interesting C++ class wrapper for the OS available.

Real Time Operating Systems (RTOS) add functionality for single-thread microcontrollers to run multiple programs at the same time without threatening the firmware developer’s sanity. This project adds C++ to the rest of the FreeRTOS benefits. We know that people have strong feelings one way or the other about using C++ in embedded systems. However, as the 24 demo projects illustrate, it is possible.

One nice thing about the library is that it is carefully documented. A large number of examples don’t hurt either. The library is clean with just under 30 classes. It seems to have resisted the trend of having classes for everything. You know the kind of library we mean. To create an Integer object, just build a configuration object to pass to the class factory generator which…. This library doesn’t entertain any of that. It has simple abstractions around threads and timers, queues, and mutexes.

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Hackaday Prize Entry: MyComm Handheld Satellite Messenger

We live in a connected world, but that world ends not far beyond the outermost cell phone tower. [John Grant] wants to be connected everywhere, even in regions where no mobile network is available, so he is building a solar powered, handheld satellite messenger: The MyComm – his entry for the Hackaday Prize.

The MyComm is a handheld touch-screen device, much like a smartphone, that connects to the Iridium satellite network to send and receive text messages. At the heart of his build, [John] uses a RockBLOCK Mk2 Iridium SatComm Module hooked up to a Teensy 3.1. The firmware is built upon a FreeRTOS port for proper task management. Project contributor [Jack] crafted an intuitive GUI that includes an on-screen keyboard to write, send and receive messages. A micro SD card stores all messages and contact list entries. Eventually, the system will be equipped with a solar cell, charging regulator and LiPo battery for worldwide, unconditional connectivity.

2016 will be an interesting year for the Iridium network since the first satellites for the improved (and backward-compatible) “Iridium NEXT” network are expected to launch soon. At times the 66 Iridium satellites currently covering the entire globe were considered a $5B heap of space junk due to deficiencies in reliability and security. Yet, it’s still there, with maker-friendly modems being available at $250 and pay-per-use rates of about 7 ct/kB (free downstream for SDR-Hackers). Enjoy the video of [Jack] explaining the MyComm user interface:

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