Two pairs of boards described in the article, with toggle switches and RCA jacks, shown interconnected, LEDs on all four boards lit up.

Boards For Playful Exploration Of Digital Protocols

Teaching people efficiently isn’t limited to transmitting material from one head to another — it’s also about conveying the principles that got us there. [Mara Bos] shows us a toolkit (Twitter,
nitter link
) that you can arm your students with, creating a small playground where, given a set of constraints, they can invent and figure communication protocols out on their own.

This tool is aimed to teach digital communication protocols from a different direction. We all know that UART, I2C, SPI and such have different use cases, but why? Why are baud rates important? When are clock or chip select lines useful? What’s the deal with the start bit? We kinda sorta figure out the answers to these on our own by mental reverse-engineering, but these things can be taught better, and [Mara] shows us how.

Gently guided by your observations and insights, your students will go through defining new and old communication standards from the ground up, rediscovering concepts like acknowledge bits, bus contention, or even DDR. And, as you point out that the tricks they just discovered have real-world counterparts, you will see the light bulb go on in their head — realizing that they, too, could be part of the next generation of engineers that design the technologies of tomorrow.

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Reverse Engineering The TEC-06 Battery Tester

[Syonyk] read that you could solder a few wires to a TEC-06 battery capacity tester, connect it to a TTL serial adapter, and it would interface with some Windows software via a serial port. You can buy it already enabled for serial, but since he had the non-connected version, he was interested in trying it. Not only did it work, but he took the time to reverse engineer the protocol and made a detailed write up about his findings and how he attacked the problem.

Around here, we never need an excuse to reverse engineer anything. But [Synonyk] mentions that he didn’t like using Windows-only software from China. If he wants it on Linux, or if Windows compatibility breaks with a new version, or if the software has spyware in it, he wants to be able to continue using the device. Of course, he also admits — and we get it — that he just enjoys doing it, too.

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