Gyroscopic Wi-Fi LED Die Is Pretty Fly

As cool as sculptural LED cubes are, the only thing you can really do is look at them. They’re not going to stand up to a lot of handling, and as tedious as it is to bend all those leads when building them, you probably wouldn’t want to mess with them anyway.

LED dice on the other hand are robust, blinky playthings with many possibilities, especially if they have a gyroscope and wireless control like the one [moekoe] built. Inside this tiny 25cm³ die is the equally small ESP8285-01F, which lets [moekoe] control the rainbow light show with a Blynk app.

As you will see in the excellent build video that makes this build look challenging instead of impossible, the cube gets permanently sealed up with solder joints. Most but not all of these transfer power, ground, and data around the faces.

Once the cube is together, [moekoe] uses pogo pins to program it, and can charge the little LiPo inside through contact pads. We love the idea of using a cubical printed jig to help solder the PCB edges together, but not as much as we love [moekoe]’s home-brewed SMT soldering setup.

If you want an easier way to make sculptural LED cubes, build yourself a lead-formin’ machine.

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What Time Is It? Infinity Time

Since the dawn of the infinity craze, we’ve seen all kinds of projects — mirrors, smart mirrors, coffee tables, clocks, you name it. Unfortunately all of these cool projects sit at home, unappreciated by the public. Well, not anymore. [nolandoktor] is taking infinity to the streets with this beautiful and functional vortex watch.

Though this project is pretty darned advanced, it’s all open source and completely within reach for anyone who has the tools and the time. The watch is based around an ATmega32u4 and uses a DS3231 real-time clock to keep accurate time on the WS2812 LEDs that represent the numbers. The time is displayed using R, G, and B assigned to hour, minute, and second. Actually reading the time is bit tricky until you understand how the colors work together, but something this lovely deserves to maintain a slight air of mystery.

The watch’s case parts are all printed — metal for the bezel, and SLA for the white inner ring that lets a bit of light leak out the side in order to illuminate the USB port and the two stainless steel screws that act as touch contacts. In the future, [nolandoktor] wants to add flashlight mode that turns all the LEDs white, some gaskets to resist water, and wake-on-gesture functionality with an IMU. Take a second to check out the demo after the break.

If you prefer a more traditional timepiece of infinite interest, this clock moves more mundanely, but still looks cool.

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