NVIDIA’s A.I. Thinks It Knows What Games Are Supposed Look Like

Videogames have always existed in a weird place between high art and cutting-edge technology. Their consumer-facing nature has always forced them to be both eye-catching and affordable, while remaining tasteful enough to sit on retail shelves (both physical and digital). Running in real-time is a necessity, so it’s not as if game creators are able to pre-render the incredibly complex visuals found in feature films. These pieces of software constantly ride the line between exploiting the hardware of the future while supporting the past where their true user base resides. Each pixel formed and every polygon assembled comes at the cost of a finite supply of floating point operations today’s pieces of silicon can deliver. Compromises must be made.

Often one of the first areas in games that fall victim to compromise are environmental model textures. Maintaining a viable framerate is paramount to a game’s playability, and elements of the background can end up getting pushed to “the background”. The resulting look of these environments is somewhat more blurry than what they would have otherwise been if artists were given more time, or more computing resources, to optimize their creations. But what if you could update that ten-year-old game to take advantage of today’s processing capabilities and screen resolutions?

NVIDIA is currently using artificial intelligence to revise textures in many classic videogames┬áto bring them up to spec with today’s monitors. Their neural network is able fundamentally alter how a game looks without any human intervention. Is this a good thing?

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Quick Face Recognition With An FPGA

It’s the 21st century, and according to a lot of sci-fi movies we should have perfected AI by now, right? Well we are getting there, and this project from a group of Cornell University students titled, “FPGA kNN Recognition” is a graceful attempt at facial recognition.

For the uninitiated, the K-nearest neighbors or kNN Algorithm is a very simple classification algorithm that uses similarities between given sets of data and a data point being examined to predict where the said data point belongs. In this project, the authors use a camera to take an image and then save its histogram instead of the entire image. To train the network, the camera is made to take mug-shots of sorts and create a database of histograms that are tagged to be for the same face. This process is repeated for a number of faces and this is shown as a relatively quick process in the accompanying video.

The process of classification or ‘guess who’, takes an image from the camera and compares it with all the faces already stored. The system selects the one with the highest similarity and the results claimed are pretty fantastic, though that is not the brilliant part. The implementation is done using an FPGA which means that the whole process has been pipe-lined to reduce computational time. This makes the project worth a look especially for people looking into FPGA based development. There is a hardware implementation of a k-distance calculator, sorting and selector. Be sure to read through the text for the sorting algorithm as we found it quite interesting.

Arduino recently released the Arduino MKR4000 board which has an FPGA, and there are many opensource boards out there in the wild that you can easily get started with today. We hope to see some of these in conference badges in the upcoming years.

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