The Three Faces Of The 555

In these days of cheap microcontrollers, it is hard to remember there was a time when timing things took real circuitry. Even today, for some applications it is hard to beat the ubiquitous 555 timer IC. It is cheap, plentiful, and reliable. What’s interesting about the 555 is it isn’t so much a dedicated chip as a bunch of building blocks on a chip. You can wire those building blocks up in different ways to get different effects, and [learnelectronics] has a video showing the three major modes you typically see with the 555: astable, bistable, and monostable.

The 555 is really only a few comparators, a voltage divider, one or two transistors, a flip flop and an inverter. The idea is you use a capacitor to charge and the comparators can set or reset the flip flop in different ways. A reset input or the flip flop can turn on the transistor to discharge the capacitor.

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A 100th Birthday Celebration For The Flip Flop

It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of creation as we’re building our latest widget. By the same token, it’s sometimes difficult to fully appreciate just how old some of the circuits we use are. Even the simplest of projects might make use of elements that were once a mess on some physicist’s or engineer’s lab bench, with components screwed to literal breadboards and power supplied by banks of wet-cell batteries.

One such circuit turns 100 years old in June, which is surprising because it literally is the building block of every computer. It’s the flip-flop, and while its inventors likely couldn’t have imagined what they were starting, their innovation became the basic storage system for the ones and zeros of the digital age.

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