Building DIY Acoustic Panels To Cut Down On Echoes

Plenty of hackers and makers are passionate about content creation. In the dog-eat-ice-bucket-challenge world of online video, production value is everything. If you want to improve your audio quality then cutting down on echoes is a must, and these acoustic panels will help you to do just that. 

The build starts with aluminium L-channel, affixed together into an equilateral triangle with the help of some 3D printed brackets. Two of the triangular frames are then fitted together via a series of hexagonal standoffs. Foam or housing insulation is then added to act as the primary sound absorbing material. To give an attractive finish, the panels are covered in fabric. The panels are then placed on to drywall using nails glued into the standoffs.

While the panels are likely more expensive to build than off-the-shelf foam alternatives, they have an attractive look which is key in video studio environments. If you’re wondering where to position them for the best results, there’s a simple and easy approach to figure it out. Video after the break.

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Billiards Concepts Plied To Position Acoustic Panels

If you know your way around a pool table you should be able to apply those skills to improving the sound of your home theater. [Eric Wolfram] put together a post that discusses the issues caused by unwanted sound reflections and shows how to position acoustic tiles to solve the problem.

This is a companion post to his guide on building your own acoustic tiles. Don’t worry if you haven’t gotten around to doing that yet. With just a wood frame, dense fiberglass, and some fabric they’re simple to build. They’re also easy to hang but until now you might have just guessed on where they should go.

Once you have all of your speakers and seats in position grab a mirror and some post-it notes. Take a seat as the viewer and have a friend operate the mirror as seen above. With it flat against the wall, mark each spot with a sticky-note where you can see a reflection of one of the speakers. Finding the reflection points is just like lining up a bank shot in Billiards. With five speakers (5.1 Surround Sound) and six surfaces (walls, ceiling, and floor) you should be able to mark 30 reflections points. Now decide how wild you plan to go with the project. The best result will address all 30 reflection points, but you can get by with just the front marks if you’re a bit more conservative.