Twitter IRC server, tircd

tircd

tircd is an ircd proxy for talking to the Twitter API. It should work with any standard IRC client. After running the Perl script, you authenticate to the IRC server using your Twitter username as your /nick. Join the room #twitter and the /topic will be set to your last update. Any message you type will update Twitter and the room’s topic. All of the people you are following show up in the room as users and post messages as they tweet. If you private message one of them, it will become a direct message on Twitter. Other commands work too: /whois to get a person’s bio, /invite to start following, and /kick to unfollow. The project is brand new and will be added new features in the future like Search API support. Follow @tircd for updates.

PS3 Home hacking

ps3

Last week Sony launched the public beta of Home, their virtual world for the PlayStation 3. It wasn’t met with much fanfare and has proven to be quite buggy. Many were less than charmed by scarcity being ported to the virtual world. Others took it upon themselves to hack the service. Connections between the user’s home console and Sony’s server are unencrypted. You can sniff the requests and responses off the wire and modify them live. It seems you need the console to establish the initial connection, but after that you’re free to use builtin tools like Download.jsp, UploadFileServlet, and Delete.jsp to modify any file on the host server. You can also set up a proxy server to modify content, but that will only affect what your console sees.

[photo: nic0]

[via Joystiq]

SonicWALL still hates us


In case you’ve ever wondered, “why don’t I ever run into those Hack a Day scamps at the Panera?” It’s because SonicWALL thinks we’re a “Hacking/Proxy Avoidance Systems” and the more inexplicable “Usenet News Groups.” We’ve gotten many reports from readers over the years about getting blocked by various vendors’ proxies. Do you have any trouble viewing Hack a Day from your school/work? What “service” are they using? We use ssh’s application level dynamic port forwarding to get around most systems when we’re on the road.