A Virtual Machine, In Google Sheets

In the last couple of decades we have become used to the browser taking over so many of the desktop functions for which we used to rely on stand-alone software. Email clients, calendars, office suites and much more can now be found in the cloud, courtesy of the usual technology companies.

Sometimes these cloud-based alternatives to desktop software can be a little sketchy, but often they have features that might surprise you as they edge towards parity with the packages they seek to replace. Google Docs, for instance has a full-featured built-in scripting language called Apps Script, that gives your full control of a document or spreadsheet with the help of a bit of Javascript. When [Brian Steffens] saw this it piqued his interest, so of course he had to in his words “do something weird with it”. The result of his efforts is the Google Sheets Virtual Machine, a virtual computer in software using spreadsheet cells as memory, stack, and registers.

With only a 100-cell memory and dependent entirely upon the processing power available to the host browser, this machine is not likely to set the world on fire. He gives full instruction set details, there are a couple of demo programs, a Fibronacci sequence generator and a factorial generator, but its general lack of power is not really the point. Instead its value lies in an elegant demonstration for its own sake that a virtual computer can be built in the unlikeliest of places, and for those interested enough to peer into its code, some idea how that might be achieved.

[via Hacker News]

Garage Door Opener Logs To Google Drive

A garage door opener is a pretty classic hack around these parts. IR, Bluetooth, WiFi, smartphone controlled, web interfaces — we’ve seen it all.  But if you want to keep track of people going in and out, you need some way of logging what’s happening. You could go ahead and roll up your own SQL based solution, tied into a custom web page. But there’s an easier way; you can build a garage door opener that logs events to Google Drive.

[WhiskeyTangoHotel] was looking for an ESP8266 project, and a garage door opener seemed just the ticket. It’s simple enough to code up, and control over WiFi comes in handy. Interfacing with the garage door was simple enough — the existing opener uses a simple push button, which is easily controlled by wiring up a relay to do the job. Logging is as simple as having the ESP8266 send requests to IFTTT which is set up to make posts to a Google Sheet with status updates.

The project is fairly basic, but there’s room for expansion. By using separate Maker Channel triggers on IFTTT, different users of the garage door could be tracked. It would also be easy to add some limit switches or other sensors to detect the door’s position, so it can be determined whether the door was opened or closed.

There’s always another take on the garage door opener — check out this hack that opens the garage door in response to flashing headlights.