This Micro Deltesian Is Easy For Children To Use

[Ekaggrat Singh Kalsi] submits this interesting printer he built for his daughter to use. He admits that the project started simply out of curiosity about the strange deltesian movement. In this configuration, the X and Z-axis are a delta mechanism while the Y-axis is a regular Cartesian bed on rails. There’s not a load of advantages to this movement, but it is really neat.

Eventually, he had a hammer in search of a nail and decided to make the printer easy enough for his daughter to use. To this end, he added a few kid-friendly modifications. The unheated bed is removable and snaps in and out of place with magnets. Considerable attention was paid to the filament loading and unloading to make it easy for small hands to perform the process. This was accomplished through a lever based latch mechanism.

As you can see in the video after the break, the project was a success, and his daughter is growing up with access to her very own 3D printer. If you’re curious abou the classic delta robot, check out this golf ball sorter.

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Behold A DIY, Kid-Friendly Table Saw

The “table saw” swaps the saw for a nibbler; here it is cutting corrugated cardboard in a manner much like the saw it replaces.

“Kid-friendly table saw” seems like either a contradiction, a fool’s errand, or a lawsuit waiting to happen; but this wooden table saw for kids¬†actually fits the bill and shows off some incredible workmanship and attention to detail as well. The project works by using not a saw blade, but a nibbler attached to a power drill embedded inside.

Unsurprisingly, the key to making a “table saw” more kid-friendly was to remove the saw part. The nibbler will cut just about any material thinner than 3 mm, and it’s impossible for a child’s finger to fit inside it. The tool is still intended for supervised use, of course, but the best defense is defense in depth.

The workmanship on the child-sized “table saw” is beautiful, with even the cutting fence and power switch replicated. It may not contain a saw, but it works in a manner much like the real thing. The cutting action itself is done by an economical nibbler attachment, which is a small tool with a slot into which material is inserted. Inside the slot, a notched bar moves up and down, taking a small bite of any material with every stroke. Embedding this into the table allows for saw-like cutting of materials such as cardboard and thin wood.

The image gallery is embedded below and shows plenty of details about the build process and design, along with some super happy looking kids.

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