Anr air quality sensor mounted on a bike's handlebar

Measuring Air Quality Using Mobile Sensors For The Masses

Poor air quality is a major problem for city dwellers the world over. Dust, smoke, particles and noxious gases from vehicles, industry and agriculture makes many megacities downright hazardous to live in. Pinpointing the source of pollution and developing strategies for mitigation requires accurate data on pollutant levels, but obtaining these numbers is not always easy.

Enter CanAirIO, a citizen science project that aims to gather air quality data from around the world by putting sensors into the hands of as many people as possible. Its team has developed two different sensor nodes for this purpose: an indoor one that can measure CO2, and a mobile one that can measure particulate matter (PM) levels. Both versions are powered by an ESP32 microcontroller that reads out the air quality sensors and connects to the Internet using WiFi or BlueTooth. The data can then be shared online to create detailed maps showing local variations in air quality.

The design of the sensor nodes is fully open-source, allowing anyone with basic electronic skills to build them. The sensors are a Sensirion SCD30 for CO2 measurement and an SPS30 for PM levels. The mobile version comes with a neat 3D-printed enclosure that can be mounted on a bike’s handlebar, enabling the user to quickly gather data around their neighbourhood. A mobile app simplifies setting up the sensors and sharing the data.

The project has already been successful in gathering detailed data in the city of Bogot√°, Colombia, and will no doubt prove useful in many other pollution hotspots around the world. We’ve seen similar community efforts to monitor air pollution and even radiation in various places, both showing how relatively simple devices can help to make a difference in people’s wellbeing. Continue reading “Measuring Air Quality Using Mobile Sensors For The Masses”

Lamp Sheds Light On Air Quality

It can be difficult to appreciate when the air quality is decent and when it’s poor, unless conditions are so bad that you can literally see the smog hanging in the air. Rather than try to digest a bunch of air quality numbers, [guillaume_slizewicz] built Canari — a lovely lamp that sheds light on the air pollution problem by taking local air quality data and turning it into light patterns.

Canari is of course named after the brave birds that once alerted miners to dangerous air conditions before they were forced to switch to carbon monoxide sensors. This bird has a Raspberry Pi Zero W that gets air quality data from a public API and controls the lights with a PWM bonnet based on the concentration of particulates in the air. The more particulates, the dimmer the LEDs are, and the faster they fade in and out.

The main piece of data that Canari grabs is the amount of particulate matter, and the display can switch between representing the level of PM2.5 (particulate matter with diameter less than 2.5 micrometers)  in the air and PM10. Check out the demo and setup video after the break.

More of a numbers person? All you really need is a microcontroller, an air quality sensor, and a display.

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Ooohhh, That Smell: Arduino Monitors Air Quality

According to [Dr. Tom Lehrer’s] song Pollution, “Wear a gas mask and a veil. Then you can breathe, long as you don’t inhale!” While the air quality in most of the world hasn’t gotten that bad, there is a lot of concern about long-term exposure to particulates in the air causing health problems. [Ashish Choudhary] married an Arduino with a display and a pollution sensor to give readings of the PM2.5 and PM10 levels in the air.

The sensor uses a laser diode and a photodiode to detect and count particles, while a fan moves air through the system. If you aren’t up on pollution metrics, PM2.5 is a count of very fine particles (under 2.5 microns) and PM10 is a count of particles for 10 microns. You can find a datasheet for the device online.

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Particle Sniffer For Pollution Point Sources

When measuring air quality, particulate matter is an important metric to watch. The PM2.5 rating refers to particulate matter that has a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometers. While it’s often measured by authorities on a city-wide basis, [rabbitcreek] wanted a way to track down point sources indoors.

The tool [rabbitcreek] built is in a similar form factor to a typical infrared workshop thermometer. Inside, it packs a Honeywell HPMA115S0-TIR laser particle sensor, hooked up to an ESP32 which runs the show. The sensor chosen makes things easy, with the device already set up with a blower and inlet and outlet ports for taking accurate readings.. Results are displayed on an SSD1306 OLED screen. It’s all wrapped up in a 3D printed case with a trigger grip, and a dog nose on the front which hints at the devices true purpose.

In testing, the device proves capable of detecting point sources of atmospheric particulates like flowers and a toaster. It’s something we’re sure would prove handy to those working in HVAC and environmental assessment industries. We’ve seen other rigs for monitoring particulates before, too. Video after the break.

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Measuring Particulate Pollution With The ESP32

Air pollution isn’t just about the unsightly haze in major cities. It can also pose a major health risk, particularly to those with vulnerable respiratory systems. A major part of hazardous pollution is particulate matter, tiny solid particles suspended in the air. Particulate pollution levels are of great interest to health authorities worldwide, and [niriho] decided to build a monitoring rig of their own.

Particulate matter is measured by an SDS011 particulate matter sensor. This device contains a laser, and detects light scattered by airborne particles in order to determine the level of particulate pollution in PM2.5 and PM10 ranges. The build makes use of an ESP32 as the brains of the operation, chosen for its onboard networking hardware. This makes remotely monitoring the system easy. Data is then uploaded to a Cacti instance, which handles logging and graphing of the data.

For those concerned about air quality, or those who are distrustful of official government numbers, this build is a great way to get a clear read on pollution in the local area. You might even consider becoming a part of a wider monitoring network!