Spinach Photo Prints

Some people like spinach in their salads. Others would prefer it if it never gets near their fork. Still, other folks, like [Almudena Romero], use it for printing pictures, and they’re the folks we’ll focus on today.

Anthotypes are positive images made from plant dyes that fade from light exposure. Imagine you stain your shirt at a picnic and leave it in the sun with a fork covering part of the stain. When you come back, the stain not sheltered by cutlery is gone, but now you have a permanent fork shape logo made from aunt Bev’s BBQ sauce. The science behind this type of printmaking is beautifully covered in the video below the break. You see, some plant dyes are not suitable for light bleaching, and fewer still if you are not patient since stains like blueberry can take a month in the sun.

The video shows how to make your own plant dye, which has possibilities outside of anthotype printing. Since the dye fades in sunlight, it can be a temporary paint, or you could use samples all over your garden to find which parts get lots of sunlight since the most exposed swatches will be faded the most. Think of a low-tech UV meter with logging, but it runs on spinach.

If the science doesn’t intrigue you, the artistic possibilities are equally cool. All the pictures have a one-of-a-kind, wabi-sabi flare. You take your favorite photo, make it monochrome, print it on a transparent plastic sheet, and the ink will shield the dye and expose the rest. We just gave you a tip about finding the sunniest spot outdoors, so get staining.

Anthotype printing shares some similarities with etch-resist in circuit board printing processes, but maybe someone can remix spinach prints with laser exposure!

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Purely Functional Selfies: Thermal Printer Speaks Haskell

[Dan] recently got a cheap POS thermal printer to chooch remotely over ESP32. Having conquered that project, he decided to see what else he could get the printer to do. Why not use it to print pictures? Sure, it’s been done, but not with Haskell. And yeah, the pictures will be grainy and weird-ish and limited to black and white, but hey, we love black and white around here as much as the idea of doing something simply because you can.

In the first project, [Dan] had to figure out how to talk to the printer since the RS422 cable it came with didn’t seem to work. He bought a TTL-to-RS485 adapter, but then realized he could use TTL directly and wired up a ESP32/OLED dev board to it. During the course of turning it into a photo booth, he had to switch to a bigger screen with a better refresh rate.

Unfortunately, [Dan] was unable to use Haskell by itself. He blames this on the cobwebs in the Haskell ecosystem, something that isn’t a problem for languages like Python that celebrate wide usage and support. [Dan] wrote a Python script that handles image capturing, display, and listening for touch activity on the screen, but Haskell ultimately controls the printer. Check out [Dan]’s demo after the break.

This project may have been trying at times, but at least [Dan] didn’t have to give it a brain transplant to get it to do what he wanted.

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