Give Yourself A Sixth Sense With An Arduino

If you carry a smartphone around in your pocket, you have a GPS navigation system, a compass, an altimeter, and a very powerful computer at your fingertips. It’s the greatest navigational device ever created. To use this sextant of the modern era you’ve got to look down at a screen. You need to carry a phone around with you. It’s just not natural.

For this entry into the Hackaday Prize, [Vojtech Pavlovsky] has an innovative solution to direction finding that will give you a sixth sense. It’s a headband that turns your temples into the input for a clever way to find yourself around the city or a forest, and it does it with just an Arduino and a few other bits.

The idea behind the Ariadne Headband is to create a haptic navigation system for blind people, runners, bikers, or really anybody. It does this by mounting four vibration motors on a headband, connecting those motors to an Arduino, sniffing data from a digital compass, and getting data over Bluetooth from an Android app.

All of these parts come together to form a new sense — a sense of direction. By simply telling the app to make sure you’re always oriented North, or to guide you along the grid of city streets, this headband becomes an inconspicuous and extraordinarily useful way to get around.

Shmoocon: Delightful Doppler Direction Finding With Software Defined Radio

When it comes to finding what direction a radio signal is coming from, the best and cheapest way to accomplish the task is usually a Yagi and getting dizzy. There are other methods, and at Shmoocon this last weekend, [Michael Ossmann] and [Schuyler St. Leger] demonstrated pseudo-doppler direction finding using cheap, off-the-shelf software defined radio hardware.

The hardware for this build is, of course, the HackRF, but this pseudo-doppler requires antenna switching. That means length-matched antennas, and switching antennas without interrupts or other CPU delays. This required an add-on board for the HackRF dubbed the Opera Cake. This board is effectively an eight-input antenna switcher using the state configurable timer found in the LPC43xx found on the HackRF.

The key technique for pseudo-doppler is basically switching between an array of antennas mounted in a circle. By switching through these antennas very, very quickly — on the order of hundreds of thousands of times per second — you can measure the Doppler shift of a transmitter.

However, teasing out a distinct signal from a bunch of antennas virtually whizzing about isn’t exactly easy. If you look at what the HackRF an Opera Cake receive on a waterfall display, you’ll find a big peak around where you expect, and copies of that signal trailing off, separated by whatever your antenna switching frequency is. This was initially a problem for [Schuyler] and [Ossmann]’s experiments. Spinning the antennas at 20 kHz meant there was only 20 kHz difference in these copies, resulting in a mess that can’t be decoded. The solution was to virtually spin these antennas much faster, resulting in more separation, and a clean signal.

There are significant challenges when it comes to finding the direction of modern radio targets. Internet of Things things sometimes have very short packet duration, modulation interferes with antenna rotation, and packet detection must maintain the phase. That said, is this technique actually able to find the direction of IoT garbage devices? Yes, the demo on stage was simply finding the direction of one of the wireless microphones for the talk. It mostly worked, but the guys have some ideas for the future that would make this technique work a little better. They’re going to try phase demodulation instead of only frequency-based demodulation. They’re also going to try asymmetric antenna arrays and pseudorandom antenna switching. With any luck, this is going to become an easy and cheap way to do pseudo-doppler direction finding, all enabled by a few dollars in hardware and a laser-cut jig to hold a few antennas.

Two Software Defined Radio Hacks From Our Resident SDR Guru

It seem [Balint] is becoming somewhat of a SDR guru around these parts; in the past few months, he’s gotten a USB TV tuner receiver working with GNU Radio, started a software defined radio tutorial YouTube channel, and even used this project to listen in on conversations between airplanes and air traffic control. This time, [Balint] is back using this cheap USB TV tuner for radio direction finding and running HDSDR in Linux and OS X.

[Balint]’s radio direction finding presentation goes over traditional means of direction finding using the doppler effect and mechanically rotated antennas. Because [Balint] is dealing with frequencies around 150MHz (about 2 meter wavelength), building a physical direction finding setup requires spinning antennas at around 40,000 RPM; much to fast for any hardware build. [Balint]’s solution was to attach 4 antennas around the circumference of a circle and electronically switch between them many thousands of times a second. [Balint] put up a wiki page going over all the theory and implementation details of his build.

[Balint] also put wrote up a neat app to control software defined radios – including the Realtek TV dongle –  over a network. Spread over a wide enough geographic area, it could become extremely easy for anyone to play air traffic controller. The BorIP Server can also be used to run HDSDR in Linux and OS X under Wine; just connect HDSDR to the network loopback on the same machine, and you get around Wine’s distaste for accessing hardware natively.

Awesome work, and we can’t wait to see what comes out of [Balint]’s laboratory next.

Edit: instead of the dongle, [Balnt] is using a ‘real’ software radio board. A lot of people are messaging him asking if the same method of direction finding is possible with the dongle. Here’s what [Balint] has to say:

The trick, as I see it, would be to create some (more or less simple) additional hardware to take the clock signal straight off the dongle’s on-board oscillator and divide it down for use with the antenna switch, i.e. 28 MHz à tens of kHz (this is the bit that’s done in ‘software’ on the FPGA). One problem still remains however: the counter needs to remain calibrated against the known direction the antenna was pointing at the time – otherwise a stop/start of the data stream from the dongle will mean the direction will go out of sync by 90/180/270 degrees each stop/start. Perhaps someone will figure out an elegant solution for this slight hurdle!

So there you go. Up for a challenge?