The cluster of HackRFs described in the article, boards on top of each other, plugged into two 1x4 RF power splitters that are in turn plugged into a 1x2 RF power splitter. An LNA is connected to the input of the final splitter, and a cable goes off the frame from there.

A Gang Of HackRFs Makes For A Wideband SDR

[Oleg Kutkov] decided to build a wideband SDR – for satellite communication research and monitoring, you know, the usual. He decided on a battery of HackRF boards – entire eight of them, in fact. Two 1×4 and one 1×2 RF splitters and an LNA on their combined RF input made for a good start to the project, and from there, it only got more complex.

HackRF boards can be synchronized with a separate clock source, but you can’t just pull a single clock line to all of them in a star configuration. Thus, he’s built a clock distribution and amplifier board, with 4 ns propagation delay at 1 PPS, and only 10 ns delay at 10 MHz. Then, he integrated that board with the HackRF setup, adding a case, wiring up a purpose-built cable and dealing with the reflections that occurred.

HackRF boards are USB 2.0 and able to generate a stream of data up to 320 MB/s, and there’d be no viable way to aggregate eight 2.0 links into one. To solve that, he’s used eight separate PCI-E to USB 3.0 cards, each of them with one HackRF plugged in, all connected to an AMD Ryzen 9-powered PC through PCI-E risers we typically see used for mining purposes. To tie it all together, he created a gnuradio flowgraph and patched the osmocom source block to enable the external clock synchronization mechanisms he decided to use.

Each HackRF is connected to its own PCIe USB card.

In the end, [Oleg] shows us some promising results – two DVB-S transceivers visible on the waterfall display of the spectrum capture. The work is not over here, to be clear – he’s ran into a few roadblocks. The gnuradio flowgraph doesn’t lend itself well to multi-threading, even on a Ryzen 9 machine, and [Oleg] pledged to rewrite the capture mechanisms in C++ which can be nicely allocated to separate physical CPU cores, something gnuradio is apparently not quite good at.

More importantly, the spectrum captured is not continuous, and [Oleg] questions whether it can be demodulated properly. He had to resort to frequency overlaps due to upsampling, and he’s not quite sure how to compensate for that. Overall frequency stability is also in question. However, from here, seems like most of the work towards building a wideband receiver is done!

[Oleg] is typically seen on Twitter, lately doing some heavy tinkering with Starlink – as Kyiv, the city he’s currently in, is under bombardment of Russian Armed Forces. We can only respect and appreciate the dedication. In January, we’ve covered his work on an USA-imported Tesla LTE modem replacement to fix LTE band incompatibilities in Ukraine, and his blog is a treasure trove of experiments that we are yet to properly comb through, from astrophysics and satellite work to RS485 networks and Linux driver writing.

Ethernet Cable Turned Into Antenna To Exploit Air-Gapped Computers

Good news, everyone! Security researcher [Mordechai Guri] has given us yet another reason to look askance at our computers and wonder who might be sniffing in our private doings.

This time, your suspicious gaze will settle on the lowly Ethernet cable, which he has used to exfiltrate data across an air gap. The exploit requires almost nothing in the way of fancy hardware — he used both an RTL-SDR dongle and a HackRF to receive the exfiltrated data, and didn’t exactly splurge on the receiving antenna, which was just a random chunk of wire. The attack, dubbed “LANtenna”, does require some software running on the target machine, which modulates the desired data and transmits it over the Ethernet cable using one of two methods: by toggling the speed of the network connection, or by sending raw UDP packets. Either way, an RF signal is radiated by the Ethernet cable, which was easily received and decoded over a distance of at least two meters. The bit rate is low — only a few bits per second — but that may be all a malicious actor needs to achieve their goal.

To be sure, this exploit is quite contrived, and fairly optimized for demonstration purposes. But it’s a pretty effective demonstration, but along with the previously demonstrated hard drive activity lights, power supply fans, and even networked security cameras, it adds another seemingly innocuous element to the list of potential vectors for side-channel attacks.

[via The Register]

Monitor SpaceX Rocket Launches With Software-Defined Radio

The amateur radio community has exploded with activity lately especially in the software-defined radio (SDR) area since it was found that a small inexpensive TV tuner could be wrangled to do what only expensive equipment was able to do before. One common build with these cards is monitoring air traffic, which send data about their flights out in packets over the radio and can easily be received and decoded now. It turns out another type of vehicle, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 spacecraft, reports data via radio as well and with some slightly upgraded hardware it’s possible to “listen in” to these flights in a similar way.

Reddit users [derekcz] and [Xerbot] used a HackRF module to listen in to the Falcon 9’s data transmissions during its latest launch. While the HackRF is a much more expensive piece of equipment compared to the RTL-SDR dongles used to listen in on aircraft, it is much more capable as well, with a range from 1 MHz to 6 GHz. Using this SDR peripheral as well as a 1.2 m repurposed satellite dish, the duo were able to intercept the radio transmissions from the in-flight rocket. From there, they were recorded with GNU Radio, converted into binary data, and then translated into text.

It seems as though the data feed included a number of different elements including time, location information, and other real-time data about the rocket’s flight. It’s a great build that demonstrates the wide appeal of software-defined radio, and if you want to get started it’s pretty easy to grab a much cheaper dongle and use it for all kinds of applications like this. Go check out [Tom Nardi]’s piece on the last seven years of RTL-SDR to get caught up to speed.

Thanks to [Adrian] for the tip!

HackRF PortaPack Firmware Spoofs All The Things

The HackRF is an exceptionally capable software defined radio (SDR) transceiver, but naturally you need to connect it to a computer to actually do anything with it. So the PortaPack was developed to turn it into a stand-alone device with the addition of a touchscreen LCD, a few buttons, and a headphone jack. With all the hardware in place, it’s just a matter of installing a firmware capable enough to do some proper RF hacking on the go.

Enter MAYHEM, an evolved fork of the original PortaPack firmware that the developers claim is the most up-to-date and feature packed version available. Without ever plugging into a computer, this firmware allows you to receive, decode, and re-transmit a dizzying number of wireless protocols. From firing off the seating pagers at a local restaurant to creating a fleet of phantom aircraft with spoofed ADS-B transponders, MAYHEM certainly seems like it lives up to the name.

[A. Petazzoni] recently put together a detailed blog post about installing and using MAYHEM on the HackRF/PortaPack, complete with a number of real-world examples that show off just a handful of possible applications for the project. Jamming cell phones, sending fake pager messages, and cloning RF remotes is just scratching the surface of what’s possible.

It’s not hard to see why some have already expressed concern about the project, but in reality, none of these capabilities are actually new. This firmware simply brings them all together in one easy-to-use package, and while there might be an argument to be made about proliferation, we all know that the responsibility to behave ethically rests on the user and not the tools.

SDR Transmitting Gets The Power

Most hobby-grade software defined radio setups don’t transmit. Of the few that do, most of them put out anemic levels around one milliwatt or so. If you want to do something outside of the lab, you’ll need an amplifier and that’s what [Tech Minds] shows how to do in a recent video. (Embedded below.)

The video covers LimeSDR, HackRF, and the Pluto SDR, although the amplifiers should work with any transmitter. The SPF5189Z module is quite cheap and covers 50 MHz to 4 GHz, amplifying everything you throw at it. The downside is that it will amplify everything you throw at it, even parts of the signal you don’t want, such as spurs and harmonics.

Continue reading “SDR Transmitting Gets The Power”

Exposing Computer Monitor Side-Channel Vulnerabilities With TempestSDR

Having been endlessly regaled with tales of side-channel attacks and remote exploits, most of us by now realize that almost every piece of gear leaks data like a sieve. Everything from routers to TVs to the power supplies and cooling fans of computers can be made to give up their secrets. It’s scary stuff, but it also sounds like a heck of a lot of fun, and with an SDR and a little software, you too can get in on the side-channel action.

Coming to us via software-defined radio buff [Tech Minds], the video below gives a quick tour of how to snoop in on what’s being displayed on a monitor for almost no effort or expense. The software that makes it possible is TempestSDR, which was designed specifically for the job. With nothing but an AirSpy Mini and a rubber duck antenna, [Tech Minds] was able to reconstruct a readable black and white image of his screen at a range of a few inches; a better antenna and some fiddling might improve that range to several meters. He also shares a trick for getting TempestSDR set up for all the popular SDRs, including SPRplay, HackRF, and RTL-SDR.

Learning what’s possible with side-channel attacks is the key to avoiding them, so hats off to [Tech Minds] for putting together this simple, easy-to-replicate demo. To learn even more, listen to what [Samy Kamkar] has to say about the subject, or check out where power supplies, cryptocurrency wallets, and mixed-signal microcontrollers are all vulnerable.

Continue reading “Exposing Computer Monitor Side-Channel Vulnerabilities With TempestSDR”

Hacking USB Hack Chat

Join us on Wednesday, February 26 at noon Pacific for the Hacking USB Hack Chat with Kate Temkin!

For all its aggravating idiosyncrasies, the Universal Serial Bus has been a game-changer in peripheral connections for nearly a quarter of a century now. What was once simply a means to connect a mouse and a keyboard to a computer has been extended and enhanced into something so much more than its original designers intended. The flexibility that led to these innovative uses for USB also led to its ubiquity, with some form of the connector sprouting from nearly every imaginable device.

Kate Temkin is well-versed in the intricacies of the Universal Serial Bus. As a software lead for Great Scott Gadgets, Kate has developed software and firmware for GSG’s products, like GreatFET and HackRF. Kate also contributes to and maintains a number of open-source projects, including the FaceDancer project. And when she’s not busy with all of this, she can be found sharing her deep knowledge with USB security training courses, where she shows how USB is vulnerable to attack, and what to do to prevent it.

Join us for the Hacking USB Hack Chat this week, where Kate will discuss anything and everything about USB. Come learn about what the future holds for the USB standard, and what you can do to keep your USB project on track.

join-hack-chatOur Hack Chats are live community events in the Hackaday.io Hack Chat group messaging. This week we’ll be sitting down on Wednesday, February 26 at 12:00 PM Pacific time. If time zones have got you down, we have a handy time zone converter.

Click that speech bubble to the right, and you’ll be taken directly to the Hack Chat group on Hackaday.io. You don’t have to wait until Wednesday; join whenever you want and you can see what the community is talking about. Continue reading “Hacking USB Hack Chat”