How To Make Bisected Pine Cones Look Great, Step-by-Step

[Black Beard Projects] sealed some pine cones in colored resin, then cut them in half and polished them up. The results look great, but what’s really good about this project is that it clearly demonstrates the necessary steps and techniques from beginning to end. He even employs some homemade equipment, to boot.

Briefly, the process is to first bake the pine cones to remove any moisture. Then they get coated in a heat-activated resin for stabilizing, which is a process that infuses and pre-seals the pine cones for better casting results. The prepped pine cones go into molds, clear resin is mixed with coloring and poured in. The resin cures inside a pressure chamber, which helps ensure that it gets into every nook and cranny while also causing any small air bubbles introduced during mixing and pouring to shrink so small that they can’t really be seen. After that is cutting, then sanding and polishing. It’s an excellent overview of the entire process.

The video (which is embedded below) also has an outstanding depth of information in the details section. Not only is there an overview of the process and links to related information, but there’s a complete time-coded index to every action taken in the entire video. Now that’s some attention to detail.

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An Old Way To Make A New Crank Handle

When the crank handle on [Eric Strebel]’s cheapo drill press broke in two, did he design and print a replacement? Nah. He kicked it old school and cast a new one in urethane resin.

In his newest video, [Eric] shows us his approach to molding and casting a handle that’s likely stronger than the original. The old crank handle attached to the shaft with a brass collar and a grub screw, so he planned around their reuse. After gluing the two pieces together and smoothing the joint with body filler, he packs the back of the handle with clay. This is a great idea. The original handle just has hollow ribbing, which is probably why it broke in the first place. It also simplifies the cast a great deal.

Here’s where things get really interesting. [Eric] planned to make a one-piece mold instead of two halves. At this point it becomes injection molding, so before he gets out the reusable molding box, he adds an injection sprue as an entry point for the resin, and a plug to support the sprue and the handle. Finally, [Eric] mixes up some nice bright Chevy orange resin and casts the new handle. A few hours later, he was back to drilling.

Crank past the break to watch [Eric]’s process, because it’s pretty fun to watch the resin rise in the clear silicone mold. If you want to take a deeper dive into injection molding, we can fill that need.

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Adventures In Mold Making And Making Your Own Enclosures

case

The folks at SC-3000 survivors have been working on a cartridge capable of storing dozens of games for the ancient Sega SC-3000 computer. The PCB works beautifully, but making a case for their cartridge left them with few options. They could use a 3D printer or simply collect a whole bunch of used cartridge cases, but making their own mold for a cartridge case was the best solution.

To create the mold for their multicart enclosure, the SC-3000 survivors first took an old, used case and made a silicone mold. While the first attempt at mold making was encouraging, several problems began to crop up due to the lack of vent holes and wiggling the mold before the resin had set. Before long, a proper technique to make resin casts was developed: use lots of resin, and don’t apply pressure or rubber bands to a curing mold.

We’re always impressed by what can be done with a few sheets of plastic, some Bondo, and the inordinate amounts of patience and sandpaper we see with other case mods and enclosure builds. the SC-3000 survivors put together an enclosure that rivals any Bondo build, and we’re happy they put out this tutorial.