3D Printed Raspberry Pi NAS with Dual Drive Bays

While it might not pack the computational punch you’d usually be looking for in a server platform, you can’t beat how cheap the Raspberry Pi is. As such, it’s at the heart of many a home LAN, serving up files as a network attached storage (NAS) device. But the biggest problem with using the Pi in a NAS is that it doesn’t have any onboard hard drive interface, forcing you to use USB. Not only is this much slower, but doesn’t leave you a lot of options for cleanly hooking up your drives.

This 3D printable NAS enclosure designed by [Paul-Louis Ageneau] helps address the issue by integrating two drive bays which can accommodate 2.25 inch laptop hard disk drives and their associated IB-AC6033-U3 USB adapters. The drives simply slide into the “rails” designed into the case without the need for additional hardware. There’s even space in the bottom of the case for a USB hub to connect the drives, and a fan on the top of the case to help keep the whole stack cool. It still isn’t perfect, but it’s compact and doesn’t look half bad.

The design is especially impressive as it doesn’t require any supports, an admirable goal to shoot for whenever designing for 3D printing. As an added bonus, the entire case is designed in OpenSCAD and licensed under the GPL v3; making modification easy if you want to tweak it for your specific purposes.

This certainly isn’t the strongest Raspberry Pi enclosure we’ve ever seen, that title would have to go to the ammo case that does double duty as a media streamer, but looks like it would make a great home for that new 3 B+ you’ve got on order.

Printed It: Custom Enclosure Generator

You’ve written your firmware code, etched your own PCB, and now it’s time to put that awesome new project of yours into an enclosure. Unfortunately, all you have is a generic Radio Shack project box that you picked up when they were clearing out their inventory. If you put your project in that, it’ll have all the style and grace of a kid wearing hand-me-down clothes. Your project deserves a tailor-made enclosure, but the prices and lead time on custom plastic enclosures are prohibitive for one-off projects.

In Ye Olde Olden Days, the next step might have been to start bending some sheet metal. But it’s the 21st century, and we’ve got mechanization on our side. The “Ultimate Box Maker” by [Heartman] is a fully parametric OpenSCAD design which allows you to generate professional looking enclosures by simply providing your desired dimensions and selecting from a few optional features. In a couple of hours, you’ll have a custom one-of-a-kind enclosure for your project for a few cents worth of filament.

That’s the idea, at least. For this edition of “Printed It”, I’ll be taking a look at the “Ultimate Box Maker” by generating and printing a basic enclosure. As somebody whose Radio Shack was out of enclosures by the time I got there and who doesn’t want to slice his hand open folding sheet metal, I’m very interested in seeing how well this design works.


So in theory, this design is supposed to work with the Thingiverse Customizer, which is basically just a web front-end for OpenSCAD. You get nice little sliders and dialog boxes, and once you have all your information entered, it will render you a custom STL to download. It’s arguably one of the best ideas MakerBot has come up with in regards to how Thingiverse works. Unfortunately, at the time of this writing, Customizer doesn’t seem to work anymore and just gives an error about missing libCGAL.so.10. Sigh.

In that case, we’ll need to download the .scad file from the “Thing Files” tab and open it up in OpenSCAD locally. All the configuration values are up at the top of the file and clearly labeled, which makes this fairly easy.

Obviously, you’re going to want to adjust the overall box dimension variables at the minimum. But there are also a whole set of options for PCB standoffs (position, diameter, screw size, etc), as well as options related to the built-in vents.

Making use of the OpenSCAD import(); function, you can bring in an STL of an existing PCB and see exactly how it will look in the rendered case. As a demonstration, I’ll be making a small enclosure for the Pi Zero, so I’ve imported an STL of it and used that to align the PCB standoffs. But even if you don’t import an STL to use as a guide, there’s a helpful “ghost PCB” that floats around inside the case while your editing the file in OpenSCAD.

Exporting the STL

Once you’ve edited the variables to your liking, you’ll want to scroll a little farther down in the code to find a section that looks like the following:

/* [STL element to export] */
//Coque haut - Top shell
TShell = 0;// [0:No, 1:Yes]
//Coque bas- Bottom shell
BShell = 1;// [0:No, 1:Yes]
//Panneau avant - Front panel
FPanL = 0;// [0:No, 1:Yes]
//Panneau arrière - Back panel
BPanL = 0;// [0:No, 1:Yes]

These options selectively turn on and off the different parts of the model for when it comes time to export the STL. If you don’t turn the other parts off before export, you’ll just get a useless “assembled” STL.

Unfortunately, the script is not smart enough to reposition the objects for STL export; so you’ll have to manually flip over the top piece in your slicer, for example. Another annoyance I found is that, even if you turn off the bottom of the case (BShell), the PCB feet still remain. You need to go back up to the script configuration settings and turn them off manually, look for the option called “PCBFeet”.

Having worked with OpenSCAD for a while I know why [Heartman] wouldn’t have included rotating the parts on export: it’s a whole lot of code to implement something that the end user can do with a click in their slicer. But making sure the PCB standoffs aren’t rendering when the user is just trying to get the top or side panel is a fairly big omission and would really only take a single conditional statement to fix.

Finally, there is some early support for generating customized front and rear panels, including functions to generate openings and labels. But personally, I would suggest just taking the blank panel generated by the OpenSCAD script and importing it into a 3D CAD program your comfortable with. The panel generation code just isn’t ready for prime-time, in my opinion.


The design that [Heartman] has come up with for the case is really quite clever, and shouldn’t pose a problem printing. There are no overhangs so support is unnecessary, though you may want to turn off the vents if your printer has issues with stringing, as the thin openings can get clogged up. I printed my case at 0.2 mm layers and 15% infill, though larger cases could probably get away with 0.3 mm layer height for the sake of speed.

The design is forgiving in terms of tolerances, and no cleanup was needed after printing to get the parts together. The fit on the front and rear panels is perfect; loose enough that they don’t need to be sanded to git in the channels but tight enough that they don’t rattle around once the lid is screwed down. Incidentally, you must screw the lid down, as the two pieces don’t actually have any interlocking components. A potential improvement to the design would be a way to make the lid snap-fit.

Final Thoughts

Overall, I think the enclosures generated by the “Ultimate Box Maker” OpenSCAD script are fantastic. They look extremely professional, are very sturdy, and print easily. This is definitely a design I’ll be adding to my regular bag of tricks going forward.

I especially like that this is a printable design that clearly addresses a valid need. One-off projects need one-off enclosures, and 3D printing is perfect for that. While we’ve previously covered printed tools that deserve a spot on your bench, the argument could always be made that you’d be better off buying the “real thing”. But I believe this project offers a solution which is actually superior to traditional methods in a number of ways.

Thingiverse’s Customizer dropping the ball on this one is especially annoying, as [Heartman] went through the trouble of making sure his design worked with it — there’s some special syntax Thingiverse has you add to OpenSCAD to make their front-end work. Having a web-based tool to generate custom enclosures would be extremely handy, and I wonder if somebody in the community might just take up the challenge of restoring the service MakerBot seems not to maintain?

Simple Jig Gives Plastic Homes to Orphaned Projects

Look around your bench and chances are pretty good that there’s a PCB or scrap of perfboard or even a breadboard sitting there, wires and LEDs sprouting off it, doing something useful and interesting. Taking it to the next level with a snazzy enclosure just seems too hard sometimes, especially if you don’t have access to a 3D printer or laser cutter. But whipping up plastic enclosures can be quick and easy with this simple acrylic bending outfit.

At its heart [Derek]’s bending rig is not much different from any of the many hot-wire foam cutters we’ve featured. A nichrome wire with a tensioning spring is stretched across a slot in a flat work surface. The slot contains an aluminum channel to reflect the heat from the wire upward and to protect the MDF bed; we wonder if perhaps an angle section set in a V-groove might not be more effective, and whether more vertical adjustment range would provide the wider heating area needed for wider radius bends. It works great as is, though, and [Derek] took the time to build a simple timer to control the heating element, for which of course he promptly built a nice looking enclosure.

We can imagine the possibilities here are endless, especially if you use colored acrylic or Lexan and add in some solvent welding. We’ve covered acrylic enclosure techniques before; here’s a post that covers the basics.

Continue reading “Simple Jig Gives Plastic Homes to Orphaned Projects”

Pi Handheld With a Mindblowing Enclosure

The Raspberry Pi is possibly the world’s most popular emulation platform these days. While it was never intended to serve this purpose, the fact remains that a small, compact computer with flexible I/O is ideally suited to it. We’ve featured a multitude of builds over the years using a Pi in a mobile form factor to take games on the go. [Michael]’s build, however, offers a lot more than a few Nintendo ROMs and some buttons from eBay. It’s a tour de force in enclosure design.

The build starts with the electronics. In 2017 it’s no longer necessary to cobble together five different accessory boards to handle the controls, battery charging, and display. Boards like Kite’s Super All In One exist, handling everything necessary for a handheld game console. With this as a starting point, he then set out to recreate Nintendo’s classic Game Boy, with a few tweaks to form and function.

It’s a textbook example of smart planning, design, and execution. We are taken through the process of creating the initial CAD drawings, then combining 3D printed parts with wood and carbon fibre for a look that is more akin to a high-end piece of hi-fi gear than anything related to gaming. The attention to detail is superb and the write-up makes it look easy, while [Michael] shares tips on how to safely cut carbon fibre to make your own buttons.

The final results are stunning, and it’s a great example of why a fine piece of wood is always a classy way to go for an enclosure. For another great example, try this walnut keyboard, or check out the roots of the Raspberry Pi Game Boy movement.

This 3D Printer Enclosure Takes Ventilation Seriously

A lot of work has gone into hacking common items (like IKEA Lack tables) into useful and effective 3D printer enclosures, but [Stefan.Lu] has taken a harder look at the whole business. He decided to start with some specific goals that were unmet by current solutions. In particular, he wanted to allow for proper ventilation and exhaust. Not only do some filaments smell bad, but there is ongoing research around UFP (ultra-fine particles) emitted from the 3D printing process. Just in case UFPs turn out to be this generation’s asbestos or something equally terrible, [Stefan.Lu] felt that a bit more work and expense up front would be worth it to meet his goals of a ventilation-friendly enclosure.

In addition to ventilation and exhaust, [Stefan.Lu] wanted to locate the printer at a comfortable working height, and preferred not to build things entirely from scratch. He did it for well under $200 by using a common storage rack shelf as the foundation and acrylic panels for the sides, and a few thoughtful uses of basic hardware. The angled metal supports made for easy attachment points and customization, and a combination of solid shelf plus anchoring to the wall put an end to vibrations. The side panels are secured by magnets, and [Stefan.Lu] points out that if you don’t have access to a laser cutter, cast acrylic withstands drilling and cutting better than extruded acrylic.

The final touch was a fire alarm, which is an excellent precaution. 3D printers are heating elements with multiple moving parts and they often work unattended. It makes sense to have a fire alarm around, or at least not enclose the device in highly flammable material in the first place.

Finishing A Mini PS One: SLA vs Extruded

One of the biggest lessons learned by first time 3D printer users is that not everything can be replicated and a printer is a machine and not a miracle worker. It has limitations in terms of what it can print as well as the quality of the output. For teeny tiny objects, the 0.8 mm nozzle will just not do and with resin printers on the rise, the question is, ‘are extruder printers obsolete?’

[Dorison Hugo] has made a mini version of the PS One using a Raspberry Pi which you can play games one. The kicker is that in his video, he does a comparison of an SLA printer and a cheaper extruder one for his enclosure. He goes through a laundry-list of steps to print, file, fill, repair, sand paint, sand, paint etc to try to get a good model replica of the original PS One. He then proceeds to print one with an SLA printer and finishes it to compare with the first model. The decals are printed on an inkjet for those who are wondering, and there is a custom cut heatsink in there as well that was salvaged from an old PC.

Spoiler alert! The SLA wins but in our view, just slightly. The idea is that with enough elbow grease and patience, you can get pretty close to making mini models with a cheaper machine. The SLA print needs work too but it is relatively less and for detailed models, it is a much better choice. We really enjoyed watching the process from start to finish including the Dremel work, since it is something that is forgotten when we see a 3D print. Creating something of beauty takes time and effort which stems from a passion to make.

Take a look at the video below of the time lapse and for  SLA printer fans, have a look at the DIY SLA printer which is a Hackaday Prize Entry this year. Continue reading “Finishing A Mini PS One: SLA vs Extruded”

Laser Cut Enclosures from Eagle Files

Once a project is finished, it might still need a decent enclosure. While it’s possible to throw a freshly soldered PCB in a standard enclosure, or piece of Tupperware, or cardboard box, these options don’t have the fit and finish of something custom-made. If you have a laser cutter sitting around, it’s a simple matter to cut your own enclosure, but now that process is much easier thanks to [Ray]’s latest project.

Since [Ray] was already using Eagle to design his PCBs, it seemed like a short step to using the Eagle files to design the enclosure as well. The script runs from those files and creates everything necessary to send to the laser cutter for manufacturing. Right now, [Ray] points out that the assembly time for each enclosure can be high, and this method might not be suited for large numbers of enclosures. Additionally, some of the calculations still need to be done by hand, but there are plans to automate everything in the future.

For single projects, though, this script could cut a lot of time off of designing an enclosure and building it from scratch, and could also help improve aesthetics over other options like 3D printed enclosures. Of course, if you have a quality 3D printer around but no laser cutter, there are options for custom enclosures as well.