Scratch-built Camera Gimbal for Photographer with Cerebral Palsy

We so often hack for hacking’s sake, undertaking projects as a solitary pursuit simply for the challenge. So it’s nice to see hacking skills going to good use and helping someone out. Such was the case with this low-cost two-axis handheld camera gimbal intended to help a budding photographer with a motion disorder.

When [Tadej Strah] joined his school photography club, a fellow member who happens to have cerebral palsy needed help steadying cameras for clean shots. So rather than shell out a lot of money for a commercial gimbal, [Tadej] decided to build one for his friend. A few scraps of aluminum bar stock were bent into the gimbal frames and camera mount. Two hobby servos take care of the pitch and roll axes, controlled by an Arduino talking to an MPU-6050. Mounted to a handle from an angle grinder with the battery and electronics mounted below, the gimbal looks well-balanced and does a good job of keeping the camera level.

Hats off to [Tadej] for pitching in and solving a real world problem with his skills. We like to see people helping others directly, whether it’s building a gyroscopic spoon for Parkinson’s sufferers or vision enhancement for a nearly blind adventurer.

Continue reading “Scratch-built Camera Gimbal for Photographer with Cerebral Palsy”

Dad hacks Cerebral Palsy, upgrades son’s lifestyle

[Jorge]’s son was born in 2004 after a troubling time in the womb. The son, [Ivo], wasn’t getting enough oxygen and unfortunately developed cerebral palsy. [Jorge] took it upon himself to improve his son’s life, so he got busy building some machinery for physical therapy. Today, [Ivo] is able to walk very well without the need for braces or other aids.

[Ivo] has a form of CP called Spastic quadriplegia. With [Ivo]’s disorder, his skeletal muscles are always tight meaning he’s nearly unable to walk. This can be treated with muscle relaxants such as Botox (yes, that Botox), but [Jorge] wanted to help out with his son’s physical therapy.

[Jorge] began preparing for [Ivo]’s physical therapy by building a “tripod” for him. This allows [Ivo] to stand while taking part in physical activities like ping-pong and golf. The second phase of the training was a modification to a cross-country skiing/elliptical trainer that allowed [Ivo] to practice walking. Today, [Ivo] is happily walking very well, a testament to his dad’s wishes that he has somewhat normal life. Some aluminum tubing helped, but we’re pinning this one on his dad.