PocketStation as two-factor authentication

[DarkFader] sent in his build that implements two-factor authentication on a Sony PocketStation.

The PocketStation was a PS1 accessory intended to be a competitor to the Dreamcast VMU. [DarkFader] wrote an app for his PocketStation using a fabulous PocketStation emulator and uploaded it with the PS3 memory card adapter and MCRWwin.

The PocketStation app (available here) takes a key and hashes it with the current time to generate a six digit code. Combined with Google’s support for two-factor authentication, [DarkFader]‘s memory card provides access to his Google profile.

Two-factor authentication is also used in RSA SecurID key fobs that were compromised earlier this year. This lead to a huge number of companies being penetrated. For a single person, obscurity is a reasonable (but still ultimately futile) means of providing a little more security, but a PocketStation hack is still pretty cool.

Check out the video after the break that shows [DarkFader] using his PocketStation token.

[Read more...]

RSA SecurID breach leads to intrusion at Lockheed Martin

rsa_securid

It looks like Lockheed Martin is the latest victim in what seems to be an endless string of security breaches. This time however, it does not look like a lack of security measures led to the breach. In fact, it seems that Lockheed’s implementation of a widely-trusted security tool was the attack vector this time around.

Last month we reported on the apparent compromise of RSA’s SecurID product, and while many speculated that this intrusion could lead to subsequent attacks, the firm downplayed the breach. They stated that the stolen data was unlikely to affect their customers, but as usual, the problem appears to be far larger than originally estimated.

The breadth of the intrusion is currently unknown, and with both RSA and Lockheed officials keeping mum, it may be some time before anyone knows how serious it is. When military secrets are in question however, you know it can’t be good!

RSA SecurID two-factor authentication comprimised


SecurID is a two-factor hardware-based authentication system. It requires you to enter the number displayed on a hardware fob like the one seen above, along with the rest of your login information. It’s regarded to be a very secure method of protecting information when users are logging into a company’s secure system remotely. But as with everything else, there’s always a way to break the security. It sounds like last month someone hacked into the servers of the company that makes SecurID.

You’ll need to read between the lines of that letter from RSA (the security division of EMC) Executive Chairman [Art Coviello]. He admits that someone was poking around in their system and that they got their hands on information that relates to the SecurID system. He goes on to say that the information that the attackers grabbed doesn’t facilitate direct attacks on RSA’s customers.

We’d guess that the attackers may have what they need to brute-force a SecurID system, although perhaps they have now way to match which system belongs to which customer. What’s you’re take on the matter? Lets us know by leaving a comment.

[via Engadget]