Estimate Your English Vocabulary Using Python

We take our mother tongue for granted, a language we learn as young children without realizing the effort involved. It is only when as adults we try to pick up another language that we fully understand how much hard work surrounds each acquired word.

Depending on who you listen to, estimates vary as to the size of a typical native English speaker’s vocabulary. The ballpark figures seem to put most adults under 20 thousand words, while graduates achieve somewhere around 23 thousand words. It’s a subject [Alex Eames] became interested in after reading a BBC article on it, and he decided to write his own software to produce a personal estimate.

His Python script takes the Scrabble word list, and presents the user with a list of words, for each one of which they have to indicate their comprehension. After a hundred words have been presented it calculates an estimate of the size of the user’s vocabulary. [Alex] wrote it on and for the Raspberry Pi, but it should work quite happily on any platform with Python 3. It certainly had no problem with our Ubuntu-based PC.

There is plenty of opportunity for bragging over the size of one’s vocabulary with a script like this one, but it’s something of a statistical leveler in that if you are truthful in your responses it will almost certainly put you exactly where you might expect for your age or level of education. If you want to know the result this script returned for a Hackaday scribe, for example, the answer is 23554.

This subject is a slight departure into software from our usual hardware subject matter, but it’s one of those tests that becomes rather a consuming interest when performed competitively among a group of friends. How well will you fare?

Via [Recantha]

Teach An ATTiny 85 To Swear

Let’s be honest here: one of the first things we all did when we came across speech synthesizers like the Speak-n-spell was to try swear words. [Alec Smecher] has taken this to heart, building a simple buzzer mechanism driven by an ATTiny 85 that swears repeatedly when you connect it. It is a rather simple project (or, as [Alec] himself says, it is “a satisfyingly minimalist build”), but it is quite nicely done.

The 8kHz speech sample (taken from Google Translate) is stored in the code, and written out to one of the PWM outputs of the ATTiny85 from a timing loop to directly drive the small speaker. So, all that is needed is the buzzer case, a small speaker, the ATTiny85, a power source and a few bits of wire. It’s a great example of a minimalist design: the ATTiny85 can just about drive the speaker directly, and can be run directly from batteries without requiring a power controller. Sometimes it pays to keep things simple, especially when it comes to swearing. 

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Foul-mouthed game will get you in trouble

[Fridgehead] modified his Simon Says game to include a dirty word for each lighted button. This is a real good way to teach kids to swear and to get child protective services to pay you a visit all at the same time. The hardware has been modified to use an Arduino in tandem with an ISD audio chip. These chips can record and playback sound. Although [Fridgehead] could have made it say anything he, choose four words you won’t say in front of your mother. We should warn you not to play the video after the break if you’re at work or it’ll be your boss that comes after you, not your disappointed mom.

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