From Broken Drill Bit To Knife: Backyard Forging Basics

One of our tipsters sent in a great video showing how to make knives out of old broken drill bits. It comes from [The Art of Weapons] YouTube channel which is run by a 15 year old from the UK. He’s applying old techniques to modern technology and it’s awesome to see someone young with these skills.

The beauty of this hack is aside from the tools you’ll need, it’s practically free to do. Worn out drill bit or other steel tool? No problem – heat it up and make something new. At the heart of this build is making your own forge. There’s lot of options, from using firebricks, to making a soup can forge like he did. From there, it’s really just a matter of annealing the steel (heating it up to red hot, and letting it cool down slowly in sand), and then heating it up again and forming it with a hammer and anvil.

But he doesn’t stop there: he also shows us his method of making handles for knives out of hardwood — its a pretty cool process and the finished knives are beautiful. The video below is a bit long, but well worth the watch if you’re interested in trying your own hand at forging.

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Steeping Tea Perfectly With An Arduino

While most of us here at Hack a Day can’t live without our daily java, we do understand and respect the tea drinking hackers out there, like [Brian McEvoy] the 24 Hour Engineer. Like any self-respecting hacker, [Brian] seeks to improve the efficiency of day-to-day tasks in order to spend his time on things that really matter — so he decided to automate his tea cup.

He’s 3D printed a small tea-bagging mechanism that a little RC servo motor can actuate, which allows him to control the amount of time a tea bag spends steeping in his mug. Another 3D printed enclosure includes the Arduino, a few buttons, and an LCD screen to allow you to select the steeping time for your favorite herb. In fact, the majority of this project is 3D printed which means the majority of the cost comes from the minimal electronics required — stuff you probably already have lying around. He’s also included all the design files you need in order to make your own.

The project has been in process for a while, but he’s finally finished it off, and it works great. If you’re hungry for some of the nitty-gritty build logs and troubleshooting a long the way, he’s got a whole bunch of blog posts from throughout the process.

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PS3 Eye Lives Again Thanks To Low Prices

[Henry Tonoyan] has started getting into OpenCV and digital control system projects. He needed a decent webcam that could do higher than standard frame rates. As it turns out, the PS3 Eye is actually a pretty capable little camera. Now that it’s kind of obsolete, you can have it for as little as $7 from places like Amazon!

The PS3 Eye has a standard USB interface, and after messing around with it a bit in Linux, [Henry] was able to adjust the frame rate settings for his application. He’s using a library called video for Linux with an application called qv4L2. It’s capable of 60fps at VGA, which we admit isn’t amazing, but at $7, we can’t complain — if you drop down to QVGA (320×240) you can go up to 120fps.

From there you can play around in OpenCV to your heart’s content.

Seeing as the Eye has been out for over 7 years now, it has been used in quite a few hacks since then. From an actual eyeball tracker (seriously), to an interactive projection globe with touch tracking to even a physical tower defense game.

Do Not Try this At Home: A Jet Powered Go Kart

[Colin Furze] is at it again. This time he’s built a freaking jet-engine powered go kart.

In case you’re not familiar with [Mr. Furze], he’s no stranger to building high-speed vehicles, like the fastest baby stroller in the world. And he’s also got a bit of an obsession with pulse jet engines. He’s even made one out of a toilet roll holder. He was a plumber — but now he’s one of the best mad scientist YouTube creators around. We just hope he doesn’t kick the bucket too soon with one of his extreme projects, because his safety tie probably won’t save him!

This month’s project is no exception — he’s strapping his giant pulse jet engine he used to fart on France onto the frame of a tiny go kart. “As you can see the jet to kart ratio is pretty good”. No kidding — the engine has gotta be 2.5 times as long as the go kart’s frame!

Stick around after the break to see him risk his neck for our own amusement.

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Cracking A Combo Lock In Under 30 Seconds

Forget the combination to your combo lock? Well if you’ve got a 3D printer, an Arduino, a servo and a stepper motor handy — you can build your own Combo Breaker pretty easily. It’s capable of solving any Master combination lock in 8 tries or less.

The creator [Samy Kamkar] is a privacy and security researcher, who absolutely loves finding holes in security. We actually just heard from him at our very own Hack a Day Prize: Los Angeles event, where he talked about his wireless keyboard sniffer he built into a cellphone charger.

He’s previously shown us how to crack a combo lock in 8 tries or less using an online calculator he made. This project is just an extension of that to automate the whole process.

As always he gives an extremely thorough explanation of the project in his build log video — including designing the 3D printed parts! If you wanna build your own it’ll cost just under $100 and you can grab all the necessary info and source files from his GitHub.

[Thanks for the tip Justin!]

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Stuffing A Wii U Into A Laptop

For some reason, a lot of hackers seem to have an obsession with jamming video game consoles into smaller boxes with screens. It’s more portable yes, but be honest — how much use is it actually going to get? Regardless, [RedmagnusX] has just finished up what might be the first Wii U laptop.

He’s using a 17″ laptop screen from a Dell XPS M1730, which he’s combined with a case of his own design that fits the Wii U’s guts. To interface the screen from the Wii, he picked up a driver-board from NJYtouch. He’s also managed to cram the power regulator into the laptop, and a few small speakers for audio output. He also integrated the sensor bar into the top of the unit. Not too shabby!

It reminds us a lot of this older Xbox 360 laptop mod, and looks surprisingly similar. However our favorite case mod still has to be the PlayBox — [Eddie Zarick’s] beautiful combination unit featuring an Xbox One and the PS4 in a single 22″ box.

[Thanks for the tip Jon!]

Real-Virtual 3rd Person Skiing — Your Broken Bones are the Video Game

Disappointed in the lack of proper VR games and the current technology, [Jonas Hjohlman] and some friends set out to make their own. They decided to go big or go home — and  built a device to let them ski in the third person.

We’ve seen this done as a proof of concept for walking around (and getting dizzy!) and even an attempt at third person driving which didn’t end well… We have to say, we’re pretty impressed at the Devil-may-care approach they take when trying to ski of all things — in the third person.

There’s not too much detail about the setup, but it looks like a standard pair of FPV goggles hooked up to their own wireless camera. A cameraman skier follows the player down the hill, and all the player sees is from behind.

Surprisingly, it goes a lot better than you think it would.

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