Soluble support structure can be used with any extruder-based 3D printer

3d-printing-soluble-support-structure

One of the issues with extruder-based 3D printing is that it can be very difficult to print objects that have voids in them. You simply must have something to deposit the soft material on until it has a chance to harden. [Matt] found a solution which should work for any extruder-based printer (with one caveat we’ll get to in a minute). He prints a support structure out of HIPS then later dissolves it using Limonene. The image on the left shows the object soaking for 24 hours. The final project is seen beside it.

The only real problem with this technique is that it requires a second extruder. Since printers build objects by layers, switching material in a single print head isn’t an option. HIPS stands for High-Impact Polystyrene. It extrudes at the same temperature as the ABS (235C) and adheres well to a heated bed kept at 115C. ABS will be unaffected by the hydrocarbon solvent Limonene, except for the residual smell of citrus.

Junkyard fish tank

So your house looks like a dumping ground for useless junk? Yeah, we know it’s the hacker’s curse… you just can’t stop salvaging stuff. But follow [Pontazy69’s] lead by building something useful out of that junk. He took an old polystyrene box and made it into this fishtank. You can see that the sides and back of the box has gone unaltered, but the front wall is missing. [Pontazy69] marked and cut straight lines while leaving a lip around the edge. Silicone was used to glue some acrylic (or perhaps glass?) to the inside of this lip. Once dried he added another bead around the outside to ensure it doesn’t leak. Few fish would be happy here without some type of filter so he built one of those out of an old plastic bottle and some other pieces. See videos that show you how to build both the tank and the filter after the break.

We love aquarium hacks almost as much as clock hacks. So check out the water exchange system, and a couple of different lighting systems. Then document your own aquarium projects and let us know about them.

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